Category Archives: Crowdfunding Portals

Fintech Platform futureshare Launches to Help Canadian Homeowners Unlock Their Real Estate Wealth

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Market Wired | May 18, 2017

Alternative to HELOCs and reverse mortgages means homeowners don't have to sell to tap into their home equity

TORONTO, ON--(Marketwired - May 18, 2017) - There is more than $2.9 trillion in unmortgaged real estate equity in Canada (CREA), and today fintech platform futureshare launches to help Canadians unlock that real estate wealth without taking on new debt. The company was founded in 2016 as an alternative to home equity loans, home equity lines of credit (HELOCs) and reverse mortgages and gives homeowners a lump sum free of ongoing payments and interest rates in exchange for a percentage of the home's appreciation, which can be paid out without penalty at any time or once the property is sold. futureshare's online platform is the first of its kind in Canada and is now live in beta and accepting online applications for homes within Ontario with plans to launch in Alberta, Manitoba and British Columbia by the end of 2017.

"Canada's housing market has billions in untapped equity and futureshare is giving that wealth back to Canadians to help them reduce financial stress and live happier lives. We're revolutionizing the process by giving Canadians an alternative to home equity loans or HELOCs that's interest rate and payment free, allowing them to unlock their real estate wealth and increase their cash flow," said Michael Orrbrooke, CEO and founder of futureshare. "Whether it is, for example, for home improvements, debt consolidation, for funding retirement or investing in a small business, futureshare wants to help Canadians achieve their financial goals without adding new debt."

See: Real Estate Crowdfunding - An Emerging New Asset Class

The average Canadian owes $1.67 for every dollar in income (StatsCan), and futureshare is designed to help homeowners access the equity tied up in their home without adding to their ongoing debt burden. Unlike a reverse mortgage or HELOC, futureshare doesn't require homeowners to have perfect credit scores or to fall within a specific income bracket, and it doesn't increase monthly payments. A homeowner's eligibility is based primarily on their home value and whether they have at least 25 per cent equity ownership in their home. Homeowners will be able to access on average up to 10-20 per cent of their home equity using futureshare's platform, and unlike a loan, there's no ongoing payments or interest rates.

Canada has become a hub for fintech innovation, with venture capital financing for fintech companies increasing by 74% from 2015 to 2016 (Thomson Reuters). Like other fintech platforms, futureshare's process is simple and easy to complete online. Homeowners can use the online equity release calculator to see how much of their wealth they can unlock, and once they complete the 90-second pre-qualification questions, the homeowner receives a real-time conditional offer outlining the details of the equity release amount and terms they could receive. The home is then appraised and a final offer is sent via email by futureshare to the homeowner, with the credit application and underwriting process continuing online. Homeowners receive their funds, via electronic transfer, on average within 10-15 business days of signing the final offer.

About futureshare

futureshare provides an alternative to home equity loans, home equity lines of credit (HELOCs) and reverse mortgages, helping homeowners unlock their real estate wealth without having to sell their home. The online platform provides consumers with the opportunity to receive funds based on an appraisal on their home in exchange for a portion of their homes future appreciation, meaning that homeowners have zero ongoing payments, and incur zero interest. futureshare is currently available in beta in Ontario with plans to launch in Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia by the end of 2017. futureshare is based in Toronto, and the platform launched in May 2017.

To learn more about futureshare, visit futureshare.ca.

Social media links:

Facebook: facebook.com/futuresharedf
Twitter: twitter.com/futuresharedf

For additional information, contact:

Jamie Gillingham
Eighty-Eight
Account Manager
jamie@eightyeightagency.com
416-944-2722

SOURCE: futureshare (view release)

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Naval Ravikant hints at future plans for Product Hunt and adding secondary trading to AngelList

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Tech Crunch | | May 19, 2017

Earlier this week, at TechCrunch’s Disrupt event in New York, we sat down with AngelList cofounder and CEO Naval Ravikant to talk primarily about the platform’s new Angel Funds product, wherein a select number of proven “angel-operators” is being provided capital from AngelList and outside VCs to invest in a basket of startups. (We wrote about that new program here.)

Of course, while we had him in our clutches, we wanted to talk with him about other directions in which AngelList might move over time. What we gleaned: the platform, which is famous for continuously iterating on its approach and offerings, may eventually use its late December acquisition of the popular product platform Product Hunt to create a paid offering for companies looking to buy specific technologies or products. It sounds like AngelList may also eventually dive into the brisk secondaries business, wherein investors buy up earlier investors stakes in certain companies.

Here are some outtakes of that chat, edited for length and clarity:

TC: Recently, a crowdfunding marketplace, Seedrs, announced that it’s going to launch a secondary marketplace. It could be interesting to see AngelList get into this business.

NR: We are obviously always looking at secondary marketplaces. The problem is how much liquidity can you have for these things. Generally, if you have a really well-known company, like a Facebook or a Snapchat, before their IPO, there’s demand from later-stage investors for a secondary marketplace. But it’s usually concentrated in a very few names.

See:  A British firm plans a secondary market for crowd-funded shares

We work at the very early stage where, frankly, people don’t know the companies. If someone wants to sell, it’s such a negative signal; it’s not clear that there’s a buyer on the other side. But 1,500 companies on the platform have already raised half a billion dollars and they’ve gone on to raise over $5 billion [in subsequent fundraising rounds], so they’re getting larger and larger and larger, and there will be a point where some of those names become so hot that there will be secondary demand. And then if those companies are open to it, we’ll work with them to fill that secondary demand.

TC: We’re also wondering what you’re doing with Product Hunt, which you acquired in December.

NR:  There’s so much innovation going on, and there’s lots of people funding that innovation, but there’s very little innovation on that infrastructure for innovation itself, so we like to do that ourselves to help companies create more tech companies. So what do tech companies need? They need money, they need talent, and they need customers. So AngelList started out with helping them raise money, now we’re the largest startup recruiting marketplace in the world, with 25,000 startups recruiting and about one million candidates. But the missing piece is helping companies find their early customers. And Product Hunt did an amazing job of that. They’ve now launched 90,000 products; they do millions of product discoveries every single month; and it’s kind of the place where teams from Uber and Facebook and Google and lots of startups go to launch their latest apps. So we were always in awe of Product Hunt and we brought them in to kind of complete the third leg of that triad.

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TC: It sounds like that could be a revenue-generating product, showing companies [needing products] who they should be talking to, what the various tech stacks are of different startups . . .

NR: Yeah, I think long term it can generate revenue. In the short term, we’ve left the team completely independent. They’re still executing on the same plans as before we merged up. And all the team and the management is still there.

TC: You also spun off a crowdfunding platform for non-accredited investors called Republic last year. Can you tell us a bit more about that and how involved you are?

NR: Crowdfunding is going to happen — it’s happening in the U.S. — it’s just happening a little bit slower than in the U.K. as [the U.S. government] works out the final [regulations]. And Republic is a spin-out that we did with some of our best people to go and start doing that. It’s still very early; Republic has done a couple of deals, but I think we’re still in the first inning of crowdfunding.

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The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support, and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. Learn more at www.ncfacanada.org.

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Ulule wants to be the “best” crowdfunding platform instead of the biggest

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Betakit | | May 10, 2017

If you’re in North America but outside Quebec, it’s entirely possible that you’ve never heard of Ulule. That’s not to say that this crowdfunding platform isn’t worth noticing. With a focus on quality rather than volume of projects funded, Ulule has an impressive 67 percent success rate: quite a contrast to the 31 percent on Kickstarter or 13 percent on Indiegogo.

“Our mission is not to make the biggest crowdfunding platform in the world. It’s to make the best crowdfunding platform.”

This past Thursday evening, Ulule celebrated its second anniversary in Montreal with a panel about crowdfunding, and a party in their new loft space. This office, in the startup-heavy Mile End neighbourhood, not only includes physical space for the Ulule team, but a seating area where projects using their platform can work under the guidance of the company’s “success managers,” along with an events space for product launches and community events.

“Our mission is wider than only a web platform,” said co-founder and CEO Alexandre Boucherot. “The needs of creators and entrepreneurs are much wider. It’s important, in our opinion, to try and invent ways to give them the best chances of success.”

Founded in France in 2010, Boucherot brought Ulule to Montreal to see if the same things that made the platform successful in Europe would translate to the Quebec market.

“We have a big focus on the coaching of projects, and the success of the project,” Boucherot told BetaKit. “Our mission is not to make the biggest crowdfunding platform in the world. It’s to make the best crowdfunding platform. And we think that crowdfunding platforms are not only about funding, but about success: finding a market, finding a public, a community.”

See:  Ulule launches The Big Step and will contribute $30,000 to high-potential France/Canada initiatives

By vetting and coaching all projects, Ulule is able to ensure that many more of their users reach their goals.

With a team of 45 people based primarily in Europe (seven in Montreal), and having been certified as a B Corporation in October 2015, the company hopes to continue their growth, while maintaining their goals for positive social impact.

They have partnered with National Bank to create a competition called Le Grand Sault (The Big Step) that gives an additional $30,000 to three projects based in France or Canada ($10,000 each). Last year’s winners included Le Geebee, an electric bike/scooter hybrid; Le Kit du Jardinier-Maraîcher, a film project that documents the daily activities of an urban farm; and Loupp, an ethically made weekend bag.

Continue to the full article --> here

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support, and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. Learn more at www.ncfacanada.org.

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A British firm plans a secondary market for crowd-funded shares

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The Economist | May 17, 2017

Everyone would like a piece of the next Google or Facebook. But the big venture-capital (VC) firms do not usually raise money from small investors. And some entrepreneurs complain that it is hard to get noticed by the hotshots in the VC industry. Hence the enthusiasm for crowd-funding, where small investors can buy a stake in startup companies.

Seedrs, a British crowd-funding firm, was set up in 2012, and has backed 500 firms so far, raising a total of £210m ($271m) from more than 200,000 users. But there are two big problems with crowdfunding. First, it is risky: most startups fail. Second, investments tend to be illiquid—shareholders have to wait for a takeover or a stockmarket flotation to recoup their investment.

See:  Seers Announces First-ever Portfolio Results With Overall 14.44% IRR (Annualized Rate of Return)

Seedrs is trying to solve the illiquidity problem by setting up a secondary market, where buyers and sellers can exchange shares. The new market will start operating this summer, and will allow trading for a week every month, starting on the first Tuesday. The price at which investors can deal will be set by Seedrs itself, based on a valuation mechanism in line with industry guidelines. But there are some restrictions: only current investors in a firm will be allowed to buy shares. And, to the extent that investors make a profit, Seedrs takes a 7.5% cut of the gains.

"An obstacle to crowdfunding is that investors have to wait so long to sell their shares"

Continue to the full article --> here

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support, and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. Learn more at www.ncfacanada.org.

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Peter-Paul Van Hoeken, CEO and Founder of FrontFundr, Joins National Crowdfunding Association of Canada’s Advisory Group

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NCFA Canada | C. Asano | May 9, 2017

Peter-Paul VanHoeken_NCFA Advisory

Peter-Paul Van Hoeken, Advisor, Investment Crowdfunding

TORONTO, MAY 8, 2017 – The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA) today announced that Peter-Paul Van Hoeken, CEO and Founder of FrontFundr, has joined the Association as Advisor, Investment Crowdfunding.

Peter-Paul is Founder and CEO of FrontFundr, a FinTech company focused on supporting start-ups and young ventures in Canada with access to capital through innovative online investment-based funding solutions.

Peter-Paul has over 15 years of experience in finance, investment management and business consultancy. He worked in Vancouver as director business development with a finance & investment company in the renewable energy space and as finance director of a real estate investment fund. Prior to that he held a number of positions with several global banks in the areas of corporate strategy, corporate & investment banking and he worked as a senior management consultant in The Netherlands. Peter-Paul is a director of the National Board of the Private Capital Markets Association, PCMA (Canada) and holds a masters’ degree in Business Economics & Finance from the Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

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“We’ve had the pleasure of working together with Peter-Paul to advance the growth and development of the equity crowdfunding ecosystem in Canada since the beginning.  He’s shown utmost commitment to make this industry work and thrive, and on behalf of the Association we’d like to thank Peter-Paul for his professionalism and early leadership.  We look forward to continuing to work together to achieve transactional efficiencies to the benefit of all stakeholders including platforms, companies and all types of investors.” Craig Asano, Founding CEO, NCFA Canada

“Investment crowdfunding unlocks a tremendous dispersed pool of capital and democratizes investing in young companies. It redefines the way that young companies look at their investors and customers. Eventually, they will become the same. I am honoured joining the NCFA Advisory Group contributing to a healthy and prosperous investment crowdfunding industry in Canada." Peter-Paul Van Hoeken, CEO & Founder, FrontFundr

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About National Crowdfunding Association of Canada

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. For more information please visit: www.ncfacanada.org.

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Craig Asano
casano@ncfacanada.org
416 618 0254

 

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Fineqia Partners with JOI Media’s Katipult for Technology Platform

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Fineqia International Inc.  Release | Karolina Komarnicka | April 11, 2017

Fineqia and Joi Media release banner

VANCOUVER, April 11, 2017 /CNW/ - Fineqia International Inc. (the "Company" or "Fineqia") (CSE: FNQ) is pleased to announce that it has partnered with Canada's JOI Media Inc. ("JOI") to use its technology platform to start Fineqia's U.K. business that brings crowd investors some of the most lucrative and risk‑mitigated opportunities that have been mostly the privy of large financial institutions.

Fineqia will use JOI's proprietary crowdfunding software product Katipult, named as one of Canada's most innovative financial technology enterprises by the Royal Bank of Canada. Katipult's white‑label platform is transforming how equity and debt private placements are funded by giving crowdfunding platforms the tools to grow and efficiently manage investor networks as well as streamline deal flow administration. The crowdfunding software facilitates the entire investment process from deal origination to investor tax reporting.

"Katipult helps us get into the market quickly and cost effectively," said CEO Bundeep Singh Rangar. "We can focus on our core debt and equity placement activities while Katipult ensures we are always on the cutting edge of compliant technology innovation."

Katipult recently introduced BlockChain into its product offering that will support Secondary Market Crowdfunding that is unforgeable and inherently trustworthy. When an offering is closed that will be secondary market eligible, a blockchain token will be created that represents this security.

"We are proud to be working with Fineqia as their technology provider.  Private capital markets are changing and there is a massive opportunity for firms that recognize the industry is shifting online," said Brock Murray, CEO of Katipult.  "Through our partnership, Fineqia is leveraging innovation to provide risk mitigated investment opportunities to investors and that is a very encouraging mandate to be a part of."

Katipult has developed crowdfunding platforms for more than 20 countries to date that are multilingual and compliant for local jurisdictions in Canada, the U.S., the U.K., Europe and Asia. Its clients include MaRS Discovery District, Qatar Development Bank, US Debt Ventures, and The Formax Group.

See:  Fineqia Announces Chairman of the Board: London Stock Exchange AIM’s Ex-Head

Fineqia's minibond platform matches quality debt and equity investment opportunities with high-net worth, institutional investors and family offices. It gives investors information advantage, and most importantly, a way-in into institutional debt deals, highlighting the risks and objectively outlining opportunities involved. The platform applies high selectivity to the offerings displayed, with only a few of the highest quality deals being shown at any given time.

About Fineqia International Inc.

Fineqia's business model is to provide an online platform and associated services for the placement of debt and equity securities, initially in the UK. The platform will transparently highlight the risks and objectively outline opportunities involved.  For more information, visit www.fineqia.com.

About JOI Media Inc.

Headquartered in Calgary, Canada with locations across three continents, JOI Media is a global leader in enterprise software and software related services. They work with reputable organizations across the private, public and social sectors.  For more information, visit www.joimedia.com.

About Katipult

Katipult is a crowdfunding software solution for private capital markets for private placements, investment crowdfunding, investor management, and listings. Katipult allows companies to design, setup, and manage an investment crowdfunding platform across multiple distribution channels including web, mobile, and social media. For more information, visit www.katipult.com

NEITHER THE CANADIAN SECURITIES EXCHANGE NOR ITS REGULATORY SERVICE PROVIDER HAS REVIEWED AND DOES NOT ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ADEQUACY OR ACCURACY OF THE CONTENT OF THIS NEWS RELEASE.

SOURCE Fineqia International Inc.

For further information: Karolina Komarnicka, Chief Marketing Officer, T: +1 (778) 654-2324, E: info@fineqia.com, W: www.fineqia.com

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. Learn more at www.ncfacanada.org.

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Crowdfunding the Canadian Knowledge Economy

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Labfundr | Eric Fisher | April 7, 2017

Pre-CCS2017 Mixer

Earlier this month on Feb 28 and Mar 1, I attended the 3rd Annual Canadian Crowdfunding Summit, hosted in Toronto by the National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA). There was a lot of energy in the room, reflected by #CCS2017 ranking among the top trending hashtags in Canada during the event.

Crowdfunding is helping fund an increasingly diverse range of projects, companies and people. We heard from platforms that are enabling real estate investments, helping make entertainment productions a reality, helping all manner of startups find seed funding, and enabling books to be published. Crowdfunding can also become a key ingredient in sustaining and growing our knowledge economy.

We heard about successes and challenges from the US and UK, which have much more mature crowdfunding industries than Canada. In Canada, the total raised via crowdfunding in 2016 was projected to be $190 million. This is 100x less than the US. Given that our populations only differ by 10x, there is plenty of room for growth.

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Financial technology (fintech) platforms such as online lending, peer-to-peer lending, blockchain crowdfunding, and a socially responsible bank were all exciting models to learn about.

Donation and rewards-based crowdfunding models are straightforward and not subject to regulation, but other alternative finance models face a challenging regulatory landscape. Paths to growth look to be through education and awareness of equity crowdfunding/alternative finance, improving regulations in a collaborative way, and harmonizing the diverse rules existing in different provinces.

Regulators from Alberta, Quebec, BC and Ontario were on hand and engaging in productive dialogues with the industry. Collaborative efforts can improve regulations and encourage more activity in the space, while ensuring legal protection for investors. In a conference filled with fintech, the term “regtech” stood out. Regulatory technology may be a key part of the equation that reduces friction for fintech startups.

Another standout panel was about diversity. Important takeaways were how subtle but powerful language choices made in job listings and company culture can encourage, or discourage, diversity among your staff. Diversity is recognized a key to success. And being new to entrepreneurship, it was inspiring to learn concrete ways to be inclusive as we grow.

I also met several scientists, completely by chance! Perhaps we have some unconscious, nerdy tells that point us toward each other (cause for an experiment, perhaps?).

Continue to the full article --> here

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. Learn more at www.ncfacanada.org.

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