Category Archives: Crowdfunding Voices

Are Overseas Portals the Next Big Thing in US Equity Crowdfunding?

Share

Crowdfund Insider | By | March 21, 2017

Non-resident US funding portal registration

Much excitement has been generated with the enactment of Regulation Crowdfunding (Reg CF) and the ability of non-accredited investors to invest in startup companies in the United States. The SEC recently reported that while early capital raising efforts is still growing, Regulation Crowdfunding has provided a new mechanism for small, domestic issuers to raise capital that was previously unavailable.

There is speculation that soon, with a Republican Administration in Washington focused on deregulation, Regulation Crowdfunding may be a “huge” beneficiary, including an expansion permitting an issuer to raise $5 or perhaps even $10 million per annum, rather than the current $1 million limit. While a common complaint during its first year is that the issuers themselves must be domestic United States companies, the same does not hold true for crowdfunding portals.

Regulation Crowdfunding specifically permits “nonresident” funding portals to operate in the United States.

A nonresident funding portal is a funding portal incorporated in or organized under the laws of a jurisdiction outside of the United States, or having its principal place of business in any place not in the United States. Thus you can operate overseas and still be permitted to engage in business as a U.S. funding portal.

See:  Title III Crowdfunding For Real, Part I

Nonresident portals can quickly broaden US crowdfunding efforts to overseas, and raise foreign investor (crowd) capital for US companies. This together with the benefit that a crowdfunding portal is specifically exempt from broker-dealer registration under Exchange Act section 15(a), provides ample incentive to foreign entrepreneurs to seek to participate in US small issuer capital formation.

Nonresident funding portals share the same benefits as domestic funding portals, including the right to post offerings on their portal and receive transaction-based compensation (commission and equity) for their services. Nonresident funding portals may even have a competitive advantage in accessing capital for US crowdfunding offerings. MrCrowd.com and its CEO Allen Au, based in Hong Kong, appear to be the first nonresident funding portal to see an opportunity and become registered with FINRA.

For the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to permit nonresident funding portals to be based outside of the US, the portals must be subject to SEC and Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) regulation. Registration of a nonresident portal is conditioned on an information sharing arrangement in place between the SEC and the competent regulator in the jurisdiction under the laws where the nonresident funding portal is organized or has its principal place of business.

Continue to the full article --> here

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. Learn more at www.ncfacanada.org.

Share

FUNDNorth. A Journey into Alternative Financing For The North

Share

Community Futures | Graham Stanley | March 17, 2017

FUNDNorth

The first-ever symposium to discuss Alternative Financing in North Central BC.

This is the sequel to the very successful and informative Community Crowdfunding Summit held last year. Over the last few years, Crowdfunding has become increasingly popular as a source of alternative financing around the globe. From your local museum to a startup business to real estate, crowdfunding is very prevalent. Therefore, crowdfunding will comprise a goodly portion of this symposium. But today there is so much more.

See:  Graham Stanley, General Manager, Community Futures Stuart Nechako, Joins NCFA’s Ambassador Program

The challenge we faced in organizing this conference was to find information pertinent to the startup business person, the local nonprofit organization, the social enterprise endeavour and the local investor with a focus on where we live; that being the North Central area of British Columbia.

As you know securing funding is not easy where ever you may be, but even more so in our area. From nonprofits to a startup business, traditionally when an innovator, a technology-based business or a social enterprise wanted to develop their product or idea, it had to be shopped around. Often these businesses or projects are considered too high risk for traditional financing, yet that innovation may fill a market gap and have the opportunity to develop into the next multi-million dollar idea.

Cognizant of all of this we gathered some of the most talented and creative minds in this province and tasked them with drilling down to the core of various forms of unconventional financing ideas available to us.

Community Futures believes it is time to bridge the knowledge gap about alternative financing. FUNDNorth will take you on a journey through a world that quite often eludes us here in the north, and put together the pieces of this puzzle. If you have been searching for this type of information you will be tremendously happy you joined us.

Register for this event --> Now

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. Learn more at www.ncfacanada.org.

 

Share

Presentation Decks from #CCS2017 (for Attendees ONLY)

Share

Thank you for attending the 2017 Canadian Crowdfinancing Summit (#CCS2017)!

CCS2017 Don't miss it!

 

CCS2017 Presentation Decks Available for Attendees Only (otherwise Confidential)

FEB 28:  Pre-Summit Workshops (OneEleven)

  1. FundingNomad Session:  Profit-Sharing or Royalty Deals for Investors & Issuers (download)
  2. Crowdmatrix Showcase:
  3. BrightSpark Ventures Workshop:  How to Invest in Early Stage Companies (download)
  4. R2Crowd Presentation:  How to Invest in Real Estate if You Don't have a Rich Uncle? (download)

MAR 1:  CCS2017 Summit (MaRS)

  1. Morning Keynote: Equity Crowdfinance:  Past, Present and Future by Ryan Feit, SeedInvest (download)
  2. Show me the Money: How We Raised USD $100+ Million (Art or Science?)
    by Zach Smith, Funded Today (download)
  3. Canadian and Global Alternative Finance Markets: Volume, Trends and Key Indicators by E.J. Reedy of University of Chicago - Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Alixe Cormick of Venture Law Corp and Daryl Hatton of FundRazr (download)
  4. Blockchain ICOs:  The Future of Online Investing or Regulatory Crisis? by Alan Wunsche, Blockchain Canada (download)
  5. How Online Funding Platforms Give Voice to a Shared Value Economy by Paul Allard, Impak Finance (download)
  6. Marketplace Lending:  Made for the People, By the People by Cato Pastoll, Lending Loop (download)
  7. Growing Your Business Faster with Diversity by Tabitha Creighton, iQMetrix and Eva Wong, Borrowell (download)
  8. Industry Experts and National Regulatory Perspectives: What to Expect in 2017?  by Jason Saltzman, (Gowling WLG), Pat Chaukos (OSC LaunchPad), Elliott Mak and Zach Masum (BCSC), Denise Weeres (ASC), and Gabriel Araish (AMF) (download OSC deck)
  9. LUNCH & LEARN:  Strategies to Protect Your Revenue by Securing Intellectual Property (IP) Rights before Launching by Tony Sebata, Sabeta IP (download)
  10. Regulatory Presentation and Q&A:  FINTECH & P2P/ONLINE LENDING 
    1. Part 1:  Zach Masum, BCSC (download); and
    2. Part 2:  Amy Tsai, OSC LaunchPad (download)
  11. Bootstrapping:  From Concept to Revenue Under in 9 Months for Under $4k by Timothy Jodoin, Edispin (download)
  12. Regulatory Presentation and Q&A:  EQUITY CROWDFUNDING/FINANCE by Gabriel Araish (AMF), Elliott Mak (BCSC), Gloria Tsang (OSC), and Denise Weeres (ASC) (download)
  13. Applying Design Thinking to Maximize Interaction on Your Website (Coming soon)
  14. How I Created an Automated Networking Machine to Meet Hundreds of Investors & VCs by Joshua Fetcher, Autopilot (download)
  15. Post-Crowdfunding Best Practices:  How to Deliver On Time On Budget - Everything you need to Know by Gareth Everard (Rockwell Razors), Owen MacMullin (DHL Canada), and Mary-Rose Sutton (Shopify) (download)
  16. The Future of Fintech:  Is Canada becoming a World Class Fintech Hub?  by Sue Britton (Fintech Growth Syndicate), Bilal Khan (OneEleven), Jake Hirsch-Allen (LinkedIn), Jim Orlando (Omers Ventures), Amelia Young (Upside Consulting Group) and Philippe Garneau (BWG Brand Engineering) (download)
  17. CLOSING KEYNOTE:  Transformative Strategies and Insights for Alternative Finance Market Growth by Martin Graham (Fineqia and London Stock Exchange) (download)

Live Pitching Presentation Decks (MaRS):

  1. Seedlify by Sam Kawtharani (download)
  2. Tripian by Cenan Yunusoglu (download) *Session 1 Pitch Winner
  3. XYZ Interactive (UVolt replacement) by Michael Kosic (download)
  4. Curexe by Johnathan Holland (download)
  5. Knote by Ron Glozman (download) *Session 2 Pitch Winner
  6. Zoom.ai by Roy Pereira (download)
  7. DashMD by Zack Fisch (download) *Session 3 Pitch Winner
  8. Better Current by Colin Campbell (download)
  9. CertClean by Jenise Lee (download)
  10. ShareWiz by Oz Demirel (download)
  11. Emerge by Alexandru Horghidan (download) *Session 4 Pitch Winner
  12. Triclops Technologies by Meng Xi Zhu (download)

Congratulations to the 4 live pitching companies:

Tripian (Cenan Yunusoglu), Knote (Ron Glozman), Dash MD (Zack Fisch), and Emerge (Alexandru Horghidan)!


Other links you may be interested in:

s

THANK YOU TO ALL OUR #CCS2017 SPONSORS AND PARTNERS!

CCS2017 Partner slide 1

CCS2017 Partner slide 2

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. Learn more at www.ncfacanada.org.

Share

The State of the Industry: Prosper President, Ron Suber Examines the Past, Present and Future of FinTech

Share

Lending Times | Lauren Twardy | Oct 26, 2016

Ron Suber - State of the industry (past, present, future)

Ron Suber serves as the president of Prosper, “America’s first online lending platform,” and brings more than 20 years of experience within the industry to the table. Recently, Lending Times had the opportunity to chat with Suber about the current state of the FinTech industry and where he thought it was heading. His insight and analysis may prove helpful for those individuals seeking a better understanding of the transition between traditional and marketplace lending.

The First Two Phases of FinTech

Suber began by saying he believes there are four phases of the FinTech Industry. The first phase began with establishing FinTech as a recognizable concept in what Suber calls the “Period of EAU: Education, Awareness, Understanding.” As with most pioneering ideas and industries, the biggest hurdle is often “fear of the unknown.” Suber comments that when the industry was getting off the ground, both industry insiders and the public reacted hesitantly to the idea of borrowing and lending on the Internet, which for most sounded “like a Ponzi scheme.” Phase One sought to establish FinTech as a legitimate course forward for lending.

See:  Why the bank referral scheme gives SME lending a much needed shake-up

Phase Two of FinTech took place early last year, according to Suber, when large finance and technology companies, as well as banks, started taking a sincere interest in marketplace lending, moving FinTech and online lending from what Suber had called a “novelty” to an “interesting new niche” in his 2015 LendIt Closing Keynote speech. Large companies and banks “sent their innovation teams and senior leadership to see all of us and find out what and how we were doing everything.” Alternative data and lending companies were no longer seen as competition but rather as potential partners for financial companies and institutions.

Phases 3 and 4: FinTech Today and the Optimistic Future

“Phase Three is now,” Suber says. Online lending platforms are going public, banks are trying to figure out how to partner with alternative lending and data companies, and regulation of the industry has begun. In this current phase, the impact of marketplace lenders has grown too great to be ignored or brushed off by the larger banks and companies. Several partnerships have formed this year between online lenders and banks, including Prosper and LendingClub with WebBank, OnDeck with JPMorgan, and Kabbage with Santander. While there has been a certain amount of leveling off to the skyrocketing growth of this industry, there is still much progress to come.

Morgan Stanley reported in June 2015 that marketplace lenders “could command $150 billion to $490 billion globally by 2020.” This kind of optimism leads to Suber’s Phase Four, where he predicts that there “will be rapid mergers, acquisitions, and full adoption into the main stream.”

Often in his speeches and interviews, Suber compares the path of FinTech to that of Uber or AirBnB. These companies change the way the world sees transportation and lodging, and FinTech innovators have the ability to do the same for lending. Suber believes that the future of FinTech is “true ubiquity.”

Continue to the full article --> here

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. Learn more at www.ncfacanada.org.

Share

For crowdfunding to succeed, we must level the playing field

Share

Globe and Mail | Robert Keller and Michael Motala | Jan 21, 2017

Crowdfunding competitiveness

Robert Keller is a senior securities lawyer with experience in regulation and private practice in both Canada and the United States; Michael Motala is a member of the Overseas Press Club of America studying at Columbia University and Osgoode Hall Law School.

The first anniversary of Canada’s crowdfunding rules is upon us, and the infant regime’s annual performance has been disappointing in global comparison. To enhance our national competitiveness, securities regulators must heed the industry’s demands for harmonized regulation and, in particular, address disparities between crowdfunding and similar sectors of alternative finance.

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA) recently estimated that, in 2016, Canadian crowdfunding raised $190-million, with capital formation growing 48 per cent from 2013-15. Yet, only a handful of companies have made use of the new crowdfunding rules, and the market’s growth pales in comparison with our British and American peers. Alternative-finance professionals blame Canada’s inefficient, onerous and regionally inconsistent regulatory landscape for the slower uptake.

Free Download:  Canada's most comprehensive report on Alternative Finance Crowdfunding in Canada

According to the NCFA, the United States and Britain have projected alternative-finance volumes of $36-billion (U.S.) and £3.2-billion respectively. Even when adjusted for our much smaller population, Canada’s crowdfunding market has underperformed, and this poses a risk to our international competitiveness by potentially limiting the growth of Canada’s most innovative small- and medium-sized businesses.

Canada’s complex securities-regulation regime is an outlier in the OECD world, and a burden for investors and firms looking to raise capital here, particularly small- and medium-sized enterprises. The securities industry has called upon the Ontario Securities Commission and other provincial regulators to remove unnecessary burdens and harmonize confusing regulations. Similarly, regulators should also turn their attention to the inconsistent regulations governing certain types of social impact investing, which is arguably a specialized type of crowdfunding.

Social impact investing capitalizes new and innovative startups that seek to solve social and environmental challenges. Like crowdfunding portals, social impact investment hubs connect socially inclined issuers with like-minded investors, usually to raise a relatively small amount of seed capital, with the advantage of avoiding the often more costly and regulation-heavy mechanisms of traditional capital markets. Canada’s leading hub, the Social Venture Connection (SVX), is a not-for-profit venture that went live 2 1/2 years ago. Already, similar ventures are receiving international attention, but little is known about the SVX among the broader Canadian public.

Part of the problem is that the gatekeepers to the social impact investment market, and SVX in particular, seem overzealous.

Don't Miss:  2017 Canadian Crowdfinance Summit (Save 40% Until Jan 31)

Prospective investors face a significant regulatory hurdle when it comes to SVX: Each must qualify as an “accredited investor” under applicable provincial securities law. This means that individuals generally need a net worth of at least $1-million (Canadian), or an annual income of at least $200,000 for the previous two years.

By contrast, anyone may invest in issuers raising capital under the crowdfunding rules. While restrictions limit how much an individual can invest in crowdfunded ventures – namely, a maximum of $2,500 a distribution, and no more than $10,000 per year – the playing field is open to all.

Presumably, in 2013, when regulators approved the SVX, they believed that only wealthy investors could sustain the potential losses relating to the high-risk investments that the SVX was expected to offer. Accredited investor restrictions were imposed essentially to protect non-wealthy investors from themselves. However, beginning in January, 2016, Canada’s crowdfunding rules went into effect, and arguably, the ventures that seek funding under those rules carry risks commensurate with those of SVX-based ventures.

Continue to the full article --> here

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. Learn more at www.ncfacanada.org.

Share

From IPO to ICO: blockchain’s finance revolution

Share

Intune Communications | Hilary Carter | Jan 19, 2017

Blockchain conference

For the past year I’ve been researching, speaking, and writing about the blockchain phenomenon and its potential to disrupt business and government as we know it. Anyone following me on social media will by now realize that I have been bitten by the blockchain bug and do my fair share to spread the “mnemonic virus.”

The Intersection of Social Media and Blockchain

Unlike many social media users, I was immediately captivated by the decentralized, global, and transparent structure of Twitter. Those characteristics connected me philosophically to the decentralized structure of open ledger networks such as the Bitcoin and Ethereum blockchains. While radically different in function and utility, both social media networks and blockchain projects have to be able to sustain malicious actors of a Byzantine Generals’ scale: in the same way that Twitter is threatened by abusive and disruptive behavior by trolls and bots, so too is blockchain technology undermined by hackers and scams.

I believe that social media has been, and will continue to be, blockchain’s best friend. Without it, the ecosystem simply could not communicate the vision, scope and benefits as quickly, nor would the ecosystem be as robust as I believe it is today.

See:  2017 Canadian Online Funding Platform Directory

Naturally it was social media which first introduced me to the blockchain. Since then, I have consumed volumes of literature and video content, become certified as a Bitcoin Professional (CBP), regularly attended MeetUps, and finally jumped in to contribute my own communications and trust-building perspectives. I’ve been introduced to a burgeoning community of innovators and visionaries (and one notable nomad). How quickly the technology will transform society I can’t begin to speculate. I do know one thing for certain, and that is that the future of value exchange is already here, and that venture crowdfunding will never be the same again.

A Career Disrupted

Why would a social media strategist have any interest in blockchain’s disruption of finance? The answer is rooted in the story of my career. I’ve had two major professional chapters in my life: the first, financial services; the second, communications, and digital innovations have come along to disrupt both. As such, I’ve had no other option but to adapt to new paradigms that are ruled by consensus algorithms — both the kind that power Amazon and the kind that enable value transfer on the blockchain. The blockchain speaks to that first chapter of my career — loudly and clearly, but is also closely related to the second.

In the same way that the internet disrupted the print industry, and along with it, my ability to sustain myself writing as a freelance contributor to print publications, social media networks are proving to be a thorn in the side of traditional media outlets. Along with my digital (and career) crisis came a new opportunity: master mobile communications apps and help business leaders become great storytellers and community-builders on them, and understand both the dirt and clouds associated with the territory.

Like the publishing industry before it, financial services is undergoing (and will continue to undergo) an equally radical transformation. The transparency and instant access to information which the internet made possible has effectively exposed the excesses of Wall Street, giving rise to the Occupy movement. The party, as many of my former colleagues knew it, was officially over. Add to the fact that digital innovations like the blockchain are democratizing finance and value transfer, and that monetary policy has all but run its course as a means to stimulate financial markets, and one can conclude that a paradigm shift in financial services is well underway.

From Global Information Exchange to Global Value Exchange

After the sub-prime mortgage crisis, the White Paper by Satoshi Nakamoto entitled Bitcoin: A Peer to Peer Electronic Cash System was published. Bitcoin, a digital currency defined by its use of cryptography, fixed coin supply, global distribution, transaction transparency, peer verification and immutability, began trading in January of 2009, creating a history of verified transaction blocks, linked together to form “the bitcoin blockchain”. This peer to peer value exchange mechanism offers efficiencies and benefits (low transaction costs being primary among them) which are poised to alter the financial system as we know it today.

The creation of bitcoin may well be a response to the bailouts that followed the global financial crisis of 2008, based on the following reference which appears alongside code lines in the bitcoin genesis block:

“The Times 03/Jan/2009 Chancellor on brink of second bailout for banks.”

From Digital Payments to Crowdfunding

Fast forward to present day where a countless number of spin-offs and applications have been built using blockchain technology. The world has witnessed the emergence of distributed micro-finance and venture capital through ICOs (Initial Coin Offerings), the most notable perhaps being the online crowdsale of Ethereum in 2014, the fifth largest crowdsale in history, where investors bought USD $18,500,000 in ether tokens using bitcoin.

You may like:  Blockchain Breakout? 2017 Will Keep Investors on the Brink

Many ICOs have occurred since, creating new opportunities for people around the world with small (or large) amounts of investment capital to participate in wide-ranging, innovative projects. All that is required is that the investment capital be in the form of a cryptocurrency. Chronobank, an Australian-based blockchain innovator in human capital, is currently conducting a crowdsale that accepts six different cryptocurrencies: bitcoin, litecoin, waves, NEM, ether, and ethereum classic, with very low minimum investment requirements.

In Canada, The TokenFunder Project is an Ethereum-based platform in development that will enable entrepreneurs and non-profits to tap into a global investor base and easily create their own tradeable, project-specific tokens and manage donations and other types of contracts. Full disclosure: I’m personally involved in this project from a communications perspective and look forward to seeing the initiative unfold. And yes, there will be a TokenFunder ICO, or ITO (Initial Token Offering) to fund the project development.

For entrepreneurs with compelling project concepts, the ICO opens the door to unprecedented levels of funding right at the outset, from investors located anywhere in the world, and without having to pay the kinds of fees associated with well-established crowdfunding platforms or indeed other means of raising seed capital.

For investors, the ICO creates access to new opportunities — though not without significant risk — at a time when equity markets are at all-time highs and interest rates remain at historic lows.

ICOs are inspiring for their potential to give everyday entrepreneurs a chance to fund their project, and the average person a window of opportunity to invest in the future, come what may. Previously, investing in groundbreaking technology was only available to insiders, high net worth individuals, and top clients in private equity houses and private banks.

Continue to the full article --> here

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. Learn more at www.ncfacanada.org.

Share

Relentless Pursuit Partners 2016 in Review: With A Splash, Craft Beer & Shout Outs From “The Hill”

Share

Relentless Pursuit Partners | Brenda Irwin | Jan 2017

Relentless pursuit partners

Keeping It Real With the Occasional Glimpse Behind The Scenes

We aren’t bragging about the B.C. weather at the moment – the ‘holiday deep freeze’ lingered well into 2017 – however, we would like to shine the light on a few moments from the final months of 2016 that made us proud.  To start … what a SPLASH by TritonWear as 2016 came to a close.

SQW to Tristan Lehari, CEO of TritonWear:  

“Oh, what I could have done if I had this technology when I was consumed by mastery.”

It is one thing when we have enthusiasm for what our portfolio companies are developing – it is altogether a new level of special when there is a national spotlight put on their products.

TritonWear Technology Is Making A Splash

TritonWear was featured at a special event linked to a national innovation strategy and identified by the federal Minister of Small Business and Tourism, and Waterloo MP, the Honorable Bardish Chagger, who had this to say at the event:

TritonWear Team CIX

TritonWear at CIX: John Crosson, Brenda, Tristan Lehari, Alex Murie

 

“TritonWear is about making Canadian swimmers more competitive so that they can outperform the world. Our government has a similar plan for the whole nation. By supporting and promoting innovative companies such as this, we are fostering the growth our economy needs.”

In addition to government recognition and accolades for TritonWear, the company received recognition from the Canadian technology industry.

In October, TritonWear was inducted into the annual Canadian Innovation Exchange’s coveted Top 20 list.


BDO Annual General Meeting Keynote

In September, Simon delivered the keynote for BDO Canada‘s AGM. He tapped into his wealth of athletic experience as both an individual and team member.

Simon shared bold examples of innovation within the sport of triathlon, his journey as a leader in the sport, how he challenged assumptions and emphasized how much he had to tap into courage to shift the paradigm.

BDO AGM SQW

NCFA Fireside Chat

Another Q4 highlight was when Simon and I hit the “speakers’ stage” together for the first time at the National Crowdfunding Association of Canada conference. The moment was amplified by having one of our portfolio founders (Louis-Victor Jadavji, co-founder of Wiivv) join us as well for a key part of the conversation.

Simon, Brenda, LV and Craig Asano (NCFA Executive Director)

Simon, Brenda, LV and Craig Asano (NCFA Executive Director).        Photo courtesy of NCFA

We shared the investors’ perspective on rewards-based crowdfunding as either a financing or product launch strategy. LV shared his lessons learned and rationale for using a crowdfunding platform to fuel a commercial product launch. Here are a few of our key messages:

#1 Lesson Learned – Private or Public?

A public crowdfunding campaign eliminates a private start-up’s ability to iterate, learn, grow, recover, and restart privately, and on a timeline that works for a company versus a consumer’s desire. Be mindful of this reality.

#2 Opportunity Realized – The Impact of the Network!

Leveraging existing networks facilitates a successful crowdfunding launch. PERIOD. By tapping into the mailing lists of your investors, accelerator, strategic and industry partners can create powerful early momentum in a campaign. Don’t be shy about “the ask.” Don’t overlook this incredible resource.

#3 Insider Investor Tip Under promise and OVER DELIVER

When defining a crowdfunding campaign sales goal, select a number that demonstrates persuasive customer adoption while having a high probability of execution. Delays in uptake or low percentage goal achievement could delay timing on your next fundraising, or negatively affect your business valuation due to perceived absence of campaign success.

The NCFA recently published a thorough industry report (including a Relentless cameo of course). Click here to access and download:

2016 Alternative Finance Crowdfunding in Canada

Continue to the full article --> here

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, leadership, support and networking opportunities to over 1500+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada. Learn more at www.ncfacanada.org.

Share