Category Archives: Stories

The Cryptocurrency Industry Might Actually Benefit From an Ad Ban

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Wired | Louise Matsakis | Apr 4, 2018

Cryptocurrency startup founders who want to advertise their new companies can no longer rely on the internet’s largest platforms to help spread their message. In January, Facebook announced it was banning ads that are "frequently associated with misleading or deceptive practices" including initial coin offerings and cryptocurrencies. Other platforms quickly followed suit; now, nearly all of the web’s most trafficked sites forbid cryptocurrency advertising. But entrepreneurs and researchers committed to the future of blockchain tech largely say they’re getting along just fine—and that the ban might even be a good thing.

In March, Google also announced a cryptocurrency crackdown that will go into effect in June across all of its platforms. Snap, Twitter, and MailChimp soon followed. And Reddit has been banning cryptocurrency ads since 2016. At this point, if you’re interested in advertising a cryptocurrency startup, your best bet might be word of mouth.

Advertising platforms like Google and Facebook have good reason to want to ban ads for cryptocurrencies and initial coin offerings, opportunities for investors to buy the tokens that power a blockchain application at a lower, early-bird price. ICOs and other cryptocurrency investment schemes are largely unregulated, and have repeatedly attracted scammers interested in ripping off unsuspecting investors. While many blockchain startups are legitimately trying to build a business using the new technology, some simply want to make a buck off the hype that comes with it.

The Securities and Exchange Commission has also indicated that many token sales are likely securities and need to be registered with the agency. By blanket banning them, advertising platforms shield themselves from the risk of promoting potentially illegal investment opportunities. On Monday for example, the SEC filed a complaint against the founders of Centra Tech Inc., a celebrity-endorsed blockchain startup, for orchestrating a fraudulent ICO. Criminal authorities separately charged and arrested the two men behind the company.

"I do think that, simply, platforms like Facebook and Google ultimately want to be seen as good corporate citizens," says Jerry Brito, the executive director of Coin Center, a non-profit research center that focuses on policy issues surrounding cryptocurrencies. "When there is an issue of investor protection that regulators in Congress have been vocal about, they are going to feel like they want to address that."

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But the blanket ban across the internet’s largest advertising platforms largely doesn’t differentiate between promising startups and outright frauds. Even well-intentioned ICOs can’t use Facebook or Google—which together control over half of the online US advertising market—to get the word out.

That can feel particularly punitive when you consider that Google itself is reportedly exploring blockchain technology, and plenty of reputable companies and organizations like the United Nations and IBM are investing in it too. Facebook has also reportedly permitted other scam-ridden industries, like the diet pill business, to utilize its advertising platform unhindered.

Paolo Tasca, an Italian economist and the executive director of University College London's Centre for Blockchain Technology, says:

These platforms aren't very willing to give a voice to decentralized blockchain companies. "If the tech giants that are in control of the majority of our data in a centralized fashion are really willing to take this direction—which is against this kind of decentralized model—it's a really a bad method," he says.

Tasca says that there are scams in every industry, and that there likely isn't a disproportionate number in the cryptocurrency space. He also argues that unlike other businesses, cryptocurrency startups usually release a detailed white paper explaining their practices, and are subject to consistent feedback and scrutiny from investors. Tasca also says that ICOs are becoming more mature, and are beginning to include new safety tools, like a tracker that can detect whether an investor's cryptocurrency wallet address is potentially associated with illegally funneled funds. In other words, the advertising ban feels like it arrived after the worst of the ICO scams have potentially already passed.

"I do think these bans have been in reaction to the ICO boom, and the ICO boom has been driven by a lot of scams and outright frauds that basically use these platforms to market token sales that quite frankly are probably not really meant to be raising funds for a real product," says Brito. "Ultimately though I think this ICO boom fizzles, the way it seems to be doing, simply because there’s irrational exuberance there."

Check out:  Central banks should consider using digital currencies: China think tank

The other concern: that a blanket ban from leading tech companies can still send the wrong message about cryptocurrencies to the general public. "The average person will read into your blanket ban an implication that you have a judgment about crypto technology broadly which you don’t, you’re just trying to address bad actors," says Brito.

Who Needs 'Em?

While the advertising ban can feel unfair, some blockchain startup founders welcome it, arguing that it largely serves to weed out bad actors in the space, rather than punish legitimate startups. “The only people who are going to be worried are the people who don’t have good intentions,” says Arran Stewart, the co-owner of Job.com, a recruiting platform that utilizes blockchain technology. “If you allow these bad apples to remain, you lose consumer confidence from the masses.”

Stewart says he relies on private networks and word of mouth to promote his Singapore-based business. “These are very sophisticated platforms, they completely understand the crypto market, they are genuinely looking out for the best interests of their users. I greatly admire them for that,” says Stewart of companies that have banned cryptocurrency advertising. Catheryne Nicholson, the CEO of BlockCypher, a company that provides infrastructure for blockchain applications, largely agrees.

"I think the ad banning is a good thing at the moment," says Nicholson. "There are too many scams happening, especially with ICOs. The scams can be hard to detect. You have to dig in, know what to look for, and ask lots of questions. Even then, you can still be duped. Spoofing a website or payment address is very common and easy to do."

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The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

 

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Close to $4.9M raised for Humboldt Broncos after deadly bus crash

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CTV News | Staff | April 7, 2018

 

Support for the Humboldt Broncos and their families is pouring in after a bus carrying the junior hockey team collided with a transport truck on a Saskatchewan highway, leaving 15 people dead and injuring another 14.

The accident occurred about 200 kilometres northeast of Saskatoon, late Friday afternoon. The RCMP confirmed 29 people were on the bus at the time of the accident.

By Saturday afternoon, there was a three-hour wait at a Saskatoon blood clinic with many people eager to donate to the victims. Staff said many of the donors were first-timers eager to help those hurt in the crash.

A GoFundMe crowdfunding campaign, started by a resident of Humboldt, Sask. had raised close to $4.9 million by Monday morning to help players and their families cope with expenses, two days after coming online.

A photo tweeted early on Saturday showed three players holding hands while laying side-by-side in their hospital beds.

The mother of former NHL player Colby Armstrong, who is originally from Saskatchewan, offered a place to stay in Saskatoon to families impacted by the crash.The Canalta Hotels chain is also offering free rooms on Saturday in Melfort, Humboldt and Martensville, so family members can stay near the victims of the accident who are in hospital.

Jordan Gadsby of the Nipawin Apostolic Church said members of his community are coming together to support those in need.

“People just want to do something,” he told CTV News Channel. “We were getting phone calls from the local co-op and No Frills and daycares and our mayor, bringing food and bringing blankets for anybody that might need blankets.”

Gadsby said he has a spare room and guest house available for those impacted by the deadly crash.

On Saturday evening, Air Canada took to Twitter to offer help to those needing to travel to the province.

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The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

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Becoming a dragon in my own right.

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FrontFundr | Jill Earthy | March 29, 2018

My parents were really good at giving me advice about most things. Most things that is, except investing. I guess they were brought up being told that you don’t talk about money. We never had any serious conversations about investing, which never bothered me until recently. I had reached that point in life (finally) where I had a good job, paid off my student loan, and had some rainy day money in the bank. It all left me wondering, what’s my next step?

I read a blog about the 50|30|20 rule, and I stick to that: 50% for fixed costs, essentials, food, rent, getting to work, 30% for discretionary spending, and 20% for saving.

I know I want to buy a condo and get on the property ladder, so that is a big goal for me. I have an online advisor who is helping me get that nest egg together. I’m maxing out my available RRSP limit which is 18% of my income. 10% of that I’ll use for my down payment, and the other 8% will go towards actually retiring one day.  That leaves me with 2% of my income to invest as I see fit. But until recently, I was still struggling with where. And how?!

A couple of weeks ago I was scrolling Facebook and saw ad online for FrontFundr. Turns out they are Canada’s largest investment crowdfunding platform (which essentially is like crowdfunding for adults - instead of perks or early access to products, you get shares in private companies). I never knew that investing in private companies was even an option for me, given I’m no Kevin O’Leary!

See:  Peter-Paul Van Hoeken, CEO and Founder of FrontFundr, Joins National Crowdfunding Association of Canada’s Advisory Group

Speaking of Dragon’s Den, I already knew that I loved watching the show and choosing the companies I would back if I were a Dragon. FrontFundr is kind of like that. I just go on their website, review the opportunities, and can invest starting at $100.

So, I did it, I backed a company with a very cool product. I completed the whole process from my phone, and it took me about 10 minutes once I decided which company I liked. I love the company. The team know what they’re doing and the numbers stack up. I know this is high risk, but I also know this is a company that I believe in -- I want them to be successful. I like the fact I can go out with my friends and talk about the company. It’s my company; I own shares in it. Most of my other investments are personless, I don’t connect with anyone, but this is one where I can truly say I own the shares.

Now you can #OwnYourShare of Canada’s largest online investment platform:

Become a dragon and invest in companies YOU believe in, starting at $250. Learn more from this person’s experience - http://blog.frontfundr.com/becoming-a-dragon-in-my-own-right

 

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The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

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Crowdfunding campaign to save Toys ‘R’ Us doesn’t include Canadian stores

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Financial Post | Tara Deschamps | March 22, 2018

TORONTO — Toy company executive Isaac Larian is hoping to keep Toys “R” Us’s Canadian operations from going out of business, but a $1 billion crowdfunding campaign he launched to rescue the company doesn’t include the country’s stores.

The executive behind California-based MGA Entertainment Inc., which makes Little Tikes, Bratz and L.O.L. Surprise! toys, announced on Thursday that he and some affiliated investors were seeking $800 million from toy lovers in hopes of acquiring “all or some” of Toy “R” Us’s assets, thus “saving the retail chain and preserving the Toys “R” Us experience for future generations.”

The efforts focus on Toys “R” Us’s U.S. stores and are separate from Larian’s attempts to buy the brand’s 82 Canadian stores, which 20 interested parties are vying for, said Toys “R” Us bankruptcy documents filed in the U.S.

“Toys “R” Us Canada is a good business,” Larian said in a statement previously. “They run it efficiently, and have good leadership. At the right price, it makes economical sense.”

Though the Canadian arm of the company filed for creditor protection in September, it said it has enough financing to stay afloat, even while the company shutters its business in the U.S. and U.K. and is reportedly likely to liquidate its ventures in Australia, France, Poland, Portugal and Spain.

Its Canadian operations are autonomous from its U.S. dealings, but Toys “R” Us CEO David Brandon has said the company will try to bundle its Canadian business with about 200 U.S. stores as it looks to find a buyer.

Larian hasn’t said how much of Toys “R” Us he is seeking.

On Thursday, Larian was drumming up attention for his crowdfunding campaign — which he admitted is for a “staggering” total — but explains that “it would take a very large sum to create a successful bid for the acquisition of such a large entity.”

By 3:30 p.m. ET on Thursday, the campaign had attracted just over $12,000, mostly in denominations of less than $100. Donors were being enticed with promises of #SaveToysRUs bumper stickers, special edition toys, invites to a reopening block party and opportunities to tour the oldest toy factory currently operating in the U.S. depending on the amount they give.

Larian and “various associates” chipped in $200 million for the campaign, leaving the other $800 million to customers. He also vowed to direct 10 per cent of proceeds from all Little Tikes purchases made between Thursday and the campaign’s May 28 end date to the campaign.

The fight to save Toys “R” Us stems in part from the role it played in Larian’s life.

“I sold my first toy to Toys “R” Us. Watching my kids walk through the aisles with smiles on their faces, it was a place for them to truly be free,” said Larian, in an email to the Canadian Press. “There’s a magic many of us experienced walking the aisles of a Toys “R” Us, a magic I want my grandchild to experience. It’s personal for me and I think it feels personal to millions of people across the U.S. and around the world.”

Toys “R” Us didn’t just offer the magic of wandering through aisles of toys. It also brought significant money to toymakers.

 

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The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

 

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SCC hears Canada and Quebec AGs arguments on national securities regulator

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Canadian Lawyer | Elizabeth Raymer | March 22, 2018

The Supreme Court of Canada heard the appeal today in Attorney General of Canada, et al. v. Attorney General of Quebec regarding the constitutionality of the implementation of a pan-Canadian securities regulation.

A national securities regulator is intended to consolidate the provincial and territorial securities regulators to better assess and minimize systemic risk in capital markets and to improve regulatory enforcement.

The effort to establish such a regulator — which has been ongoing since at least the 1970s — has suffered a series of delays and roadblocks. In May, the Court of Appeal of Quebec ruled that the proposal for a Cooperative Capital Markets Regulatory System, which is to date supported by six jurisdictions — Ontario, British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and the Yukon — but opposed by Quebec and Alberta, is unconstitutional.

In its May 10th decision, Quebec’s appellate court answered “no” to the question of whether “the Constitution of Canada authorize the implementation of pan-Canadian securities regulation under the authority of a single regulator, according to the model established by the most recent publication of the ‘Memorandum of Agreement regarding the Cooperative Capital Markets Regulatory System.’”

As to the second question put before it — whether the most recent version of the draft of the federal Capital Markets Stability Act exceeded the authority of the Parliament of Canada over the general branch of the trade and commerce power under s. 91(2) of the Constitution Act, 1867 — the Court of Appeal answered “no” to it as well. It found that the most recent version of the draft of the legislation was not beyond the jurisdiction of Parliament, except with respect to its ss. 76 to 79 concerning the role and powers of the Council of Ministers, which, if not removed, would render the act unconstitutional as a whole.

See:  NCFA Canada’s submission to Finance Canada (March 2018): Urgent Need for Regulatory Change and Government Support

Before the Supreme Court today, Francis Demers, representing the respondent Attorney General of Quebec, told the justices that the authority of the Council of Ministers, who would be drawn from each participating jurisdiction, “violates parliamentary policy” and would constitute “an abandonment of sovereignty.”

“This entity, Council of Ministers . . . could initiate legislative amendments for us; this is unprecedented,” Demers said.

He argued that a division of powers between federal and provincial governments had already been established and that, in essence, the Council of Ministers would have authority over matters of provincial jurisdiction.

Michael Conner, representing the intervener Attorney General of Manitoba, argued that federal or pan-Canadian power over capital markets should be restricted to dealing with financial crises.

But François LeBel, acting for the intervener Institute for Governance of Private and Public Organizations, said the goal of the proposed regulations was not to regulate securities, but rather the risks they represent.

“We need to have someone who looks at the system as a whole, and intervenes at that level,” he said.

A bid to establish a national securities regulator has been on the table for a long time, says Bruce Ryder, an associate professor at Osgoode Hall Law School, who studies public law and contemporary constitutional issues.

“There’s been a long history to the debate,” Ryder told Legal Feeds. “We’ve been discussing since the 1970s how to have a national securities regulator to replace the 13 systems that exist now or at least to make [regulation] consistent.”

The Harper government drafted legislation that was pushed to the Supreme Court of Canada for reference, resulting in its 2011 opinion, says Ryder. The SCC found that securities regulation was an area of divided jurisdiction and noted that systemic risk in capital markets can affect trade. In most jurisdictions that trade, securities regulation falls within provincial jurisdiction, and it has done so for a century.

See:  Self-regulation: Is it time?

“So, they said a uniform national securities act was unconstitutional because it went too far” and that a national securities regulator should involve a co-operative scheme between the provinces and federal government.

A “worst-case scenario” is that the Supreme Court will suggest some modest tweaks to the proposed scheme going forward, meaning the path to a national securities regulator will be clear, says Ryder. “Quebec and Alberta don’t have to be on side; there’s nothing that compels them to agree to this regime. The political question will be, can we persuade them [to] join? Or, if we can’t, should we go ahead with national scheme that can operate in most of provinces?”

In its 2011 opinion, the SCC said that “it shouldn’t be either federal or provincial, but you need co-operative solutions that meet needs of country as a whole. They noted they had typically been supportive of co-operative schemes that involve both federal and provincial legislation,” Ryder says, the marketing of agricultural products in Canada, which — in the case of eggs and chickens, for example — is done through national boards, and the regulation of inter-provincial trucking are two examples of this.

“I think the Supreme Court will be enthusiastic . . .  and take a friendlier perspective than Quebec did” to implementing a co-operative regulatory system, Ryder says.

Andrew Bernstein, a litigator with Torys LLP in Toronto whose practice includes public law, says that “there’s some fundamental assumptions and conclusions drawn by the Quebec Court of Appeal that appear to be inconsistent with the structure of the Cooperative Capital Markets Regulatory System.”

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The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

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Hut 8 Mining Corp. Announces Electricity Supply Agreement with City of Medicine Hat

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Hut 8 Mining | March 19, 2018

Vancouver, British Columbia, March 19, 2018 – Hut 8 Mining Corp. (TSXV: HUT) (“Hut 8” or the “Company”), is pleased to announce today that it has entered into definitive agreements with the City of Medicine Hat (“CMH”) for the supply of 42 MW of electric energy and the lease of land upon which Hut 8 will construct and operate its mining facilities near the City of Medicine Hat’s new Unit 16 power plant. The expansion marks Hut 8’s commitment of a $100 million construction investment in the community, all of which is fully funded.

Under the terms of an electricity supply agreement, CMH will provide electric energy capacity of approximately 42 megawatts to the new Hut 8 facilities, which in conjunction with the Company’s existing 18.7 MW in operation in Drumheller, will allow Hut 8 to meet 60.7 MW of a fully funded 62.7MW of power capacity by September 2018. The electricity supply agreement and the land lease both have a concurrent term of 10 years. The delivery of electric energy under the electricity supply agreement will commence upon the receipt of certain regulatory approvals and the commissioning of Hut 8’s BlockBox Data Centres, which are slated for delivery in Q2 2018.

See:

Through its partnership with the Bitfury Group, the world’s leading full-service blockchain technology company, Hut 8 has secured world-leading technology and operational expertise. This partnership, together with the success of Hut 8’s recent capital raising efforts and the provision of land and electricity through CMH, will enable the Company to  service the full complement of 57 BlockBox Data Centers with an aggregate power capacity of approximately 60.7 MW. As of March 16, 2018, Hut 8 has mined 750 bitcoins through its mining facilities in Drumheller, Alberta.

Bill Tai, Chair of the Board of Directors of Hut 8, stated, “The signing of the electricity supply agreement and the land lease represents a key component in achieving our business plan for the roll-out of our BlockBox Data Centers in low-cost energy jurisdictions. CMH offers stable cost-competitive utility rates and has been very welcoming and supportive of Hut 8’s fast paced growth plans. We’re excited to work with the City of Medicine Hat to introduce a new industry, with new revenue channels for the City and its residents.”

Hut 8’s partnership with CMH will serve as an economic stimulator for the region and will include a construction investment by Hut 8 of approximately $100 million. Site construction activity, which will commence now and is to be completed in Q3 2018, is expected to peak at about 100 well-paid jobs. Thereafter, more than 42 direct operational roles will continue on site, with some advance training at Hut 8’s existing mining facility in Drumheller, Alberta, which currently operates at 18.7 MW. These roles will include electricians, general labourers, systems technicians and security staff. In line with its corporate governance mandate, Hut 8 will seek to recruit from the local community in filling these roles.

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The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

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Bitcoin bounces $700 in less than three hours, capping wild weekend that brought it below $7,400

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CNBC | | March 19, 2018

Bitcoin prices rallied back by more than $700 in less than three hours during late Sunday trading, capping off a wild weekend that saw the digital currency plunge through $8,000 and even near the $7,000 level.

Prices are still off by 10 percent in the last seven days, according to CoinDesk.

The cryptocurrency hit a low of $7,335.57 earlier Sunday before recovering back above $8,000, according to CoinDesk. Bitcoin was trading near $8,267 as of 9:05 a.m. ET Monday.

Traders were unsure of what was behind the late comeback, but blamed another possible bitcoin advertising ban for the weakness over the weekend. Twitter is reportedly preparing to ban advertising for initial coin offerings, token sales, and cryptocurrency wallets globally, according to Sky News. The new policy could roll out in two weeks, the report said.

The move would echo other tech giants' restrictions on advertising, and efforts to crack down on cryptocurrency frauds.

Google announced an update to its financial services policy last week that will restrict advertising for "cryptocurrencies and related content" as of June.

Facebook, the world's second-largest online ad provider, said in January it would ban all ads that promote cryptocurrencies to prevent the spread of what it called "financial products and services frequently associated with misleading or deceptive promotional practices."

"Facebook was previous, but now Twitter is also rumored," said Joe DiPasquale, CEO of BitBull Capital. "Much of crypto demand is retail, so this may negatively impact demand."

See:Crypto Industry Should Self Regulate, Says CFTC Commissioner

Twitter declined to comment.

DiPasquale also pointed to the high price of mining affecting bitcoin's drop. Bitcoin miners use software to solve math problems and are given bitcoins in exchange. That now costs around $8,000 per bitcoin, he said.

"Now that it's dropped below that, there's less incentive for miners to continue to keep machines on unless they are in a lower-cost energy area or have a way of producing at less than cost," DiPasquale said.

Regulatory concern has also dampened bitcoin prices in the past weeks.

Bitcoin began its fall from $11,000 in two weeks ago following a statement by the SEC that expanded its scrutiny to cryptocurrency exchanges, and news of compromised accounts on a major Hong Kong-based exchange Binance.

Check out:  Prices Aside, Crypto’s Tech Stack Is Steadily Improving

G-20 finance ministers and central bank governors are set to meet in Buenos Aires, Argentina, beginning Monday. Cryptocurrency and bitcoin discussions will happen in a closed door session on Tuesday, a spokesperson from the G-20 told CNBC, and may be discussed at a subsequent press conference.

The Financial Stability Board (FSB), a global watchdog for G-20 economies, responded to calls from some countries to crack down on digital currencies in a letter to members Sunday.

"The FSB's initial assessment is that crypto-assets do not pose risks to global financial stability at this time," Chair of the Financial Stability Board Mark Carney said in the letter.

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The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

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