Category Archives: Enterprise

The new urgency of global tech governance

share save 171 16 - The new urgency of global tech governance

Brookings | Landry Signé, Mark Esposito, and Sanjeev Khagram | Sep 10, 2020

Global tech governance - The new urgency of global tech governancePandemic lockdowns, digitalization, and the acceleration of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) are all driving a shift in global governance. Since the world’s technological leaders will also be geopolitical leaders, the competition for dominance in cutting-edge sectors like artificial intelligence is intensifying. The 4IR technology race will be the primary factor influencing global economic and political arrangements in the post-pandemic future.

Although the United States remains the top AI power, it is closely followed by China, and then by other players such as Russia. For its part, China has already invested an estimated $300 billion in the field (including chips and electric cars), adopted a national innovation strategy (“Made in China 2025”), and enabled the rise of pioneering tech giants like Baidu, Alibaba, and Tencent. But while China has massive potential for AI development, it also has a lot of work to do before it surpasses the U.S. Studies show that China still lags on three key fronts: hardware, research, and the commercial sector.

See:  Global Survey on Impact of Covid-19 and Recession Risk: Fintech and Financial Institutions

Beyond the U.S. and China, European and Asian countries are also pursuing 4IR innovation. The United Kingdom, for example, is in the top quartile of countries in terms of AI readiness, owing to its top-tier research universities and generous public research funding. Similarly, many Asian countries have demonstrated an obvious advantage in terms of technological diffusion and robot density. With 774 robots per 10,000 workers, South Korea is far ahead of most other countries; and Japan, with its already-dominant automobile industry, has begun to establish itself as a leader in autonomous vehicles.

Against this backdrop, the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated trends toward digitalization, with an array of 4IR technologies being adopted to track, trace, forecast, diagnose, and contain the virus, in addition to enabling remote work, e-commerce, and other behavioral shifts. In fact, it was an AI platform that first spotted the signs of a viral outbreak more than a week before the World Health Organization’s official announcement. And since then, AI and machine learning have been used to track and anticipate the evolution of the pandemic, identify high-risk patients, and optimize resource usage.

Moreover, scholars are using AI to detect new COVID-19 outbreaks and to drive the research for effective treatments or a vaccine. But this work points to the need for more regulatory clarity at the global level. To avoid zero-sum “vaccine nationalism,” we need better processes for the cross-border sharing of data and technological solutions, so that no one is left behind.

The recent dynamism in health care is emblematic of 4IR geopolitics more broadly. Plenty of attention has been devoted to the escalating Sino-American rivalry since the start of the COVID-19 crisis. Less noticed is the opportunity for developing countries to use the crisis as an impetus to expand their own adoption of 4IR technologies.

In Africa, for example, an AI-powered SMS platform has been deployed to deliver educational content to out-of-school children who lack internet access, smartphones, or even textbooks. Such innovations will become even more important the longer schools remain closed. Similarly, retailers and consumers are increasingly relying on e-commerce and mobile money to maintain social distancing and preserve supply chains. And in agriculture, more farmers are using information from big-data platforms, augmented by the Internet of Things, to guide their decisionmaking.

See:  What to expect from Biden-Harris on tech policy, platform regulation, and China

But fully capitalizing on these opportunities will require more coordination between the public and private sectors and with multilateral institutions. By its very nature, the 4IR competition tempts countries to use their economic power to shape international standards. In a data-driven age, how leading governments define their approaches to regulation, including key issues such as individual privacy, will affect the entire global economic order in the years ahead.

This dynamic is already evident in how different countries have managed the use of AI-driven facial-recognition and digital contact-tracing tools during the pandemic. In South Korea and China, these technologies were widely adopted early on, and have (so far) proven effective in limiting the spread of the virus, but indisputably at the expense of individual privacy.

Continue to the full article --> here

 


NCFA Jan 2018 resize - The new urgency of global tech governance The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

Latest news - The new urgency of global tech governanceFF Logo 400 v3 - The new urgency of global tech governancecommunity social impact - The new urgency of global tech governance

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2020 FINTECH DRAFT PITCHING AND DEMO COMPANY WINNERS!



FFCON20 Pitching and Demo Winners - The new urgency of global tech governance



NCFA COVID 19 letter to government to support Fintechs and SMEs - The new urgency of global tech governance

NCFA Newsletter subscribe600 - The new urgency of global tech governance

 

share save 171 16 - The new urgency of global tech governance

C.D. Howe Institute Report: Open Banking Holds Promise, Risks for Consumers

share save 171 16 - C.D. Howe Institute Report:  Open Banking Holds Promise, Risks for Consumers

C.D. Howe Institute | Sep 10, 2020

C.D. Howe Institute report on Open Banking Implementation - C.D. Howe Institute Report:  Open Banking Holds Promise, Risks for Consumers

September 10, 2020 – The path towards safe and secure implementation of open banking should be guided by three consumer-focused pillars, says a new report from the C.D. Howe Institute.

Open Banking – North American Style

UK government open banking tender puts focus on payments

In “Open Banking in Canada – The Path to Implementation,” authors Thorsten V. Koeppl and Jeremy Kronick lay out a roadmap to guide Canada’s upcoming open banking consultations, and explore the potential benefits and risks to consumers.

Open banking gives customers of financial institutions control over when and how to share their financial data, putting households and businesses back in charge of deciding when a provider can access their data. “Open banking breaks the monopoly banks and non-bank financial institutions currently have on their customer data,” write the authors.

Koeppl and Kronick propose a gradual, step-by-step implementation approach, introducing open banking to financial services with the least regulatory hurdles first. They also suggest the open banking roadmap be guided by three core objectives: generating value for consumers, building secure infrastructure for data sharing, and improving the regulatory framework to protect consumers.

The authors argue that constrained market experimentation should underpin generating value for consumers. Third-party providers, such as “Fintechs,” should be allowed to start offering their services to consumers in a controlled environment where policymakers take into account potential risks.

“In the long run, for open banking to become an unequivocal success, Canada will require a fundamental and extensive overhaul of its regulatory framework,” conclude Koeppl and Kronick. “Open banking may very well be the catalyst to achieve such change. If not, Canada is unlikely to realize the same benefits from Fintech that other countries like the UK or Australia are likely to enjoy.”

FFCON20 Video: Transformation of Digital Banking to Open Finance

FFCON20 Video: Adam Felesky Fireside keynote with Kevin Carmichael - Can Fintechs Succeed and Open Banking?

Secondly, building secure infrastructure for data sharing would ensure consumers gain control over the data they generate. Technology needs to be standardized and improved so consumers can manage data access everywhere in a secure and easy way. As such, the authors call for clear legislation for data privacy, a digital ID system, and a clear liability framework regarding data sharing and usage.

Lastly, Canada’s regulatory framework needs to be brought into the age of Fintech through a new framework for handling consumer complaints from third-party providers and streamlined financial regulation across jurisdictions.

Continue to the full article --> here

Download PDF Report (24 pages) - Open Banking Implementation -> Now


NCFA Jan 2018 resize - C.D. Howe Institute Report:  Open Banking Holds Promise, Risks for Consumers The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

Latest news - C.D. Howe Institute Report:  Open Banking Holds Promise, Risks for ConsumersFF Logo 400 v3 - C.D. Howe Institute Report:  Open Banking Holds Promise, Risks for Consumerscommunity social impact - C.D. Howe Institute Report:  Open Banking Holds Promise, Risks for Consumers

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2020 FINTECH DRAFT PITCHING AND DEMO COMPANY WINNERS!



FFCON20 Pitching and Demo Winners - C.D. Howe Institute Report:  Open Banking Holds Promise, Risks for Consumers



NCFA COVID 19 letter to government to support Fintechs and SMEs - C.D. Howe Institute Report:  Open Banking Holds Promise, Risks for Consumers

NCFA Newsletter subscribe600 - C.D. Howe Institute Report:  Open Banking Holds Promise, Risks for Consumers

 

share save 171 16 - C.D. Howe Institute Report:  Open Banking Holds Promise, Risks for Consumers

How Fintech is Changing the Mortgage Industry

share save 171 16 - How Fintech is Changing the Mortgage Industry

Guest Post | Sep 8, 2020

Fintech innovation - How Fintech is Changing the Mortgage IndustryWhen it comes to changing the way we utilise financial services, fintech is beginning to significantly impact the mortgage industry. With new companies continuously redeveloping approaches to home buying, future homeowners are being provided with convenience, quality, and personalisation.

Using Tech to Address the Downsides of Buying a Home

As of right now, the housing sector continues to depend principally on the traditional mortgage market – for prospective homeowners, this is a complex and bloated process with significant room for growth.

Where in particular is there room for improvement? There are a number of answers, according to various fintech firms worldwide. Tic:Toc home loans is such an example, with the start-up aiming to offer 22-minute home loan applications through the use of digital technology that processes an application automatically, in real time.

For another point of difference, REALas is a digital platform that has highlighted the need for predictable and accurate property pricing. Their claim involves a proprietary algorithm that accurately speculates sale prices, with predictions averaging within 5.4% of the actual price.

See:  Where are the Biggest Fintech Startup Hotspots Around the World?

With a different approach to the industry, Effi utilises AI in offering what they claim to be “the smartest mortgage broker platform ever built”. This focus on integrated efficiency, effectiveness and customisation aims to move the industry beyond traditional CRMs and lead management tools, automating and streamlining the mortgage broker job process.

A final example, Lucas, provides an innovative approach to addressing the problem consumers face when raising a deposit for a mortgage. Lucas has redefined the concept of the mortgage, facilitating home ownership through renting. The company purchases properties from real estate funds, before making them available to pre-vetted tenants who will initially contribute as little as five percent towards the property purchase price.

 

The Impact of Fintech Businesses Transforming Consumer Experiences

Given the extremely high value of property markets in any given country, online only fintech businesses are threatening a significant impact on banks and credit unions that have traditionally dominated the mortgage market.

Not only does fintech hold a remarkable percentage of refinanced loans (in the US, fintechs originate more refinanced loans than a combination of their 5 largest banks), but US market share of traditional lenders decreased by 22% from 2007 to 2014. Lower mortgage closing times, higher innovation and flexibility, and more targeted offerings are aspects and goals that traditional lenders will need to work towards in order to remain competitive, and many are doing so.

 

Big Bank Fintech Investment

It is clear that not only start-ups that are showing interest in fintech within the mortgage industry - when it comes to Canada, there is significant disruption within the financial services and mortgage sectors. Despite ranking a low 23 out of 27 countries in the market adoption of fintech, Canada is ahead of the US, France, and Japan. In particular, the Bank of Nova Scotia has developed ‘eHOME’, a tool that digitises the entire mortgage process in real time, allowing the elimination of contact with financial advisors and mortgage specialists.

Overseas, big banks such as Westpac in Australia are making significant investments. Both in the form of big commitments such as backing venture capital firm Reinventure, and in small features like their flexible mortgage calculator (click here to check it out), Westpac is making a point of demonstrating the feasibility of fintech services within the banking and mortgage industries.

US banks are also getting involved, with 24 equity deals to fintech’s in 2019. Some mortgage start-ups that have been backed by US banks include Built, Rabbet, and Trussle.

 

The Future of the Mortgage Industry

The commitment to innovation and fintech by a range of companies across the mortgage industry highlights the increasing role that technology is having in reshaping financial markets.

The various service offerings that are becoming available within the property market are continuing to shape business models, push new customer experiences, and scale companies more rapidly. Ultimately, the mortgage industry is in the process of exciting change – being a previously underdeveloped area within the financial sector, there is still much to look forward to when it comes to fintech and property.

 


NCFA Jan 2018 resize - How Fintech is Changing the Mortgage Industry The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

Latest news - How Fintech is Changing the Mortgage IndustryFF Logo 400 v3 - How Fintech is Changing the Mortgage Industrycommunity social impact - How Fintech is Changing the Mortgage Industry

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2020 FINTECH DRAFT PITCHING AND DEMO COMPANY WINNERS!



FFCON20 Pitching and Demo Winners - How Fintech is Changing the Mortgage Industry



NCFA COVID 19 letter to government to support Fintechs and SMEs - How Fintech is Changing the Mortgage Industry

NCFA Newsletter subscribe600 - How Fintech is Changing the Mortgage Industry

 

share save 171 16 - How Fintech is Changing the Mortgage Industry

Who needs banks? How tech companies are taking a bite out of financial services

share save 171 16 - Who needs banks? How tech companies are taking a bite out of financial services

Financial Post | James McLeod | Aug 21, 2020

Frictionless experience - Who needs banks? How tech companies are taking a bite out of financial servicesTech companies moving to create 'frictionless' experience so small businesses can get access to money quickly

In early August, Montreal-based Lightspeed POS Inc. announced it would start offering loans of up to US$50,000 per retail location to merchants in the United States that already use its point-of-sale software.  In the announcement, Lightspeed said merchants will, in most cases, get the funds deposited into their account one day after applying.  The company’s customers tend to be mid-sized retailers such as jewelry stores and sporting goods retailers, not the big national chains, but bigger than an independent storefront.

Chief executive Dax Dasilva said such financing might be particularly good for buying inventory, or for launching a new marketing campaign, but he also expects that the speed of the loans could open up new opportunities that merchants haven’t been able to take advantage of before.

FFCON20 Video: Reducing Friction in Banking and Financial Transactions

“Let’s say you wanted to bring in a couple pallets of inventory that you knew would be successful, but the hassle of getting a small loan from the bank, all of that, maybe it’s something you don’t end up doing,” Dasilva said in an interview.

There’s a lot of buzz in the technology world about financial services. Apple Inc. now has a credit card that tightly integrates with an iPhone app, and its Apple Pay product.  Uber Technologies Inc. issues a Visa debit card to drivers that is tied to a chequing account. Facebook Inc. has even tried to create its own money in the form of the Libra cryptocurrency.

"It’s very possible, that Every Company Will Be a Fintech Company," as Angela Strange, a general partner at the influential Silicon Valley venture-capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, headlined her blog post in January,

For one thing, it’s another line of revenue for the technology companies. In its most recent quarter, the company’s subscription revenue was US$196 million, but it took in another US$518 million from “merchant solutions,” which is mostly fees for payment processing and loans to merchants through the Shopify Capital lending product.

“Big companies don’t have problems with banking today, because banks are designed to serve big companies. But small companies do have problems: they can’t get access to money.”

Earlier this year, Shopify expanded its lending program to Canada and the United Kingdom, after introducing it in the United States in 2016.  Shopify also offers a payment card to merchants, and the company makes a point-of-sale kit including a card reader.  But Nejatian said Shopify isn’t trying to become a bank for merchants; it’s just trying to figure out all the services that a merchant needs to succeed.

“I think if all we do here is replicate a bank, we’ve failed miserably. That’s not the goal,” he said. “My goal is to help create the next million entrepreneurs and make it easier for them to launch, grow and succeed in running their business. Some of those things will be financial services, some of them won’t be.”

See:  Is this the new face of Generation Z banking?

Wealthsimple is one company trying to build a competitor to the traditional banks.

“What you see a lot of companies trying to do — and we’re no different — is owning the client experience and deepening the client experience in all sorts of ways over time by removing friction,” he said.

“The banks are giant companies that have huge install bases of a lot of clients that aren’t going to go anywhere,” he said. “It’s a generational change. Banks have an opportunity to make those investments now. It’s not going to be easy, but it’s also going to require rethinking their business model, rethinking the way they make products.”

Continue to the full article --> here

 


NCFA Jan 2018 resize - Who needs banks? How tech companies are taking a bite out of financial services The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

Latest news - Who needs banks? How tech companies are taking a bite out of financial servicesFF Logo 400 v3 - Who needs banks? How tech companies are taking a bite out of financial servicescommunity social impact - Who needs banks? How tech companies are taking a bite out of financial services

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2020 FINTECH DRAFT PITCHING AND DEMO COMPANY WINNERS!



FFCON20 Pitching and Demo Winners - Who needs banks? How tech companies are taking a bite out of financial services



NCFA COVID 19 letter to government to support Fintechs and SMEs - Who needs banks? How tech companies are taking a bite out of financial services

NCFA Newsletter subscribe600 - Who needs banks? How tech companies are taking a bite out of financial services

 

share save 171 16 - Who needs banks? How tech companies are taking a bite out of financial services

Start-up JIKO co-founded by ex-Goldman trader is first fintech to complete takeover of a national bank

share save 171 16 - Start-up JIKO co-founded by ex-Goldman trader is first fintech to complete takeover of a national bank

CNBC | Hugh Son | Sep 3, 2020

Jiko CEO - Start-up JIKO co-founded by ex-Goldman trader is first fintech to complete takeover of a national bankKey Points

  • A tiny start-up led by a former Goldman Sachs trader has become the first fintech firm to complete the acquisition of a nationally regulated U.S. bank, CNBC has learned.
  • Jiko, a 23-person company co-founded by Stephane Lintner, has closed a deal to purchase Mid Central National Bank, a 63-year old retail bank based in Minnesota, according to people with knowledge of the transaction.
  • Instead of being held in deposits, customer money is swept into Treasury Bills, which are liquidated when a person uses a debit card or withdraws cash from ATMs.
  • The Jiko account generated a 3.3% annualized return last year, far outstripping the nominal rate that most big banks pay, Lintner said. But interest rates have fallen since then as the Federal Reserve slashed rates in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

A tiny start-up led by a former Goldman Sachs trader has become the first fintech firm to complete the acquisition of a nationally-regulated U.S. bank, CNBC has learned.

Jiko, a 23-person company co-founded by Stephane Lintner, has closed a deal to purchase Mid Central National Bank, a 63-year old retail bank based in Minnesota, according to people with knowledge of the transaction. The start-up secured approval for the move from the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, these people said.

See:  Banks in US Can Now Offer Crypto Custody Services, Regulator Says

The move by Jiko, which bills itself as a new kind of bank, gives it broad access to the highly-regulated U.S. market. Fintech firms have to choose one of three ways to break into this market: acquire a banking institution, apply to become a chartered bank, or partner with an existing lender.

Most of the new breed of online only-banks like Chime and Current chose to team up with existing FDIC-backed institutions, as that is the fastest way to get started. Last month, Varo Money became the first consumer fintech firm to earn a banking charter from the government through an application.

But Jiko, a company that has flown under the radar since its creation in 2016, is the first of the recent wave of fintechs to complete the takeover of a regulated bank, allowing it to offer Americans a broad array of financial services. Lending Club, one of the biggest U.S. providers of personal loans, said it was buying Radius Bancorp in February, but that deal will close in 2021, CNBC reported at the time.

“The move by Jiko represents an important milestone in the maturity and evolution of fintech companies seeking to expand the reach of their products and services,” Acting Comptroller of the Currency Brian Brooks said in a statement. “It demonstrates the value and attractiveness of banks and in particular the federal banking system.”

Continue to the full article --> here

 


NCFA Jan 2018 resize - Start-up JIKO co-founded by ex-Goldman trader is first fintech to complete takeover of a national bank The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

Latest news - Start-up JIKO co-founded by ex-Goldman trader is first fintech to complete takeover of a national bankFF Logo 400 v3 - Start-up JIKO co-founded by ex-Goldman trader is first fintech to complete takeover of a national bankcommunity social impact - Start-up JIKO co-founded by ex-Goldman trader is first fintech to complete takeover of a national bank

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2020 FINTECH DRAFT PITCHING AND DEMO COMPANY WINNERS!



FFCON20 Pitching and Demo Winners - Start-up JIKO co-founded by ex-Goldman trader is first fintech to complete takeover of a national bank



NCFA COVID 19 letter to government to support Fintechs and SMEs - Start-up JIKO co-founded by ex-Goldman trader is first fintech to complete takeover of a national bank

NCFA Newsletter subscribe600 - Start-up JIKO co-founded by ex-Goldman trader is first fintech to complete takeover of a national bank

 

share save 171 16 - Start-up JIKO co-founded by ex-Goldman trader is first fintech to complete takeover of a national bank

New correspondent banking data – the decline continues at a slower pace*

share save 171 16 - New correspondent banking data - the decline continues at a slower pace*

BIS | CPMI publication | Aug 31, 2020

global digital world - New correspondent banking data - the decline continues at a slower pace*

  • The number of active correspondent banks worldwide fell by about 3% in 2019 and about 22% between 2011 and 2019.

  • The volume and value of cross-border payments continued to grow over the last eight years, suggesting a higher concentration in payment flows.

Cross-border payments are vital for economic growth, international trade, global development and financial inclusion. Yet they are generally slower, more expensive, less transparent and less accessible than domestic payments. These long-standing issues have been thrown into sharp relief by improvements in domestic payments and by developers of proposals for new payment arrangements. The G20 has made enhancing cross-border payments a priority during the 2020 Saudi Arabian Presidency and has asked the Financial Stability Board (FSB) to coordinate the development of a roadmap to tackle the system's multidimensional problems. To address these issues, in response to a remit from the G20, the Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures (CPMI) has developed the building blocks of a global roadmap with the aim of making durable improvements in cross-border payments.

Corresponding banking relationships declining - New correspondent banking data - the decline continues at a slower pace*

Correspondent banking is a crucial part of any solution that enhances cross-border payments. To settle cross-border payments, most payment service providers rely on the so-called correspondent banking network - a network that is shrinking and becoming more concentrated. Thus, monitoring these trends is of first-order importance for the international community.

See: 

Google and Gates Foundation to help spread digital payments in developing countries

BNY Mellon Report: Global Payments 2020: Transformation and Convergence

How payments can adjust to the coronavirus pandemic—and help the world adapt

Bank of Canada Speech: Money and Payments in the Digital Age

 

To help do so, the CPMI will, for the next three years, publish an annual quantitative review based on payment message data that SWIFT has agreed to provide. The review includes (i) this commentary, highlighting key trends; (ii) a chartpack; and (iii) the underlying data. It builds on similar analyses by the CPMI and FSB.

2019 CPMI quantitative review of correspondent banking data

The 2019 data confirm that correspondent banking relationships continue to contract in number. Despite the worldwide decline, they continue to play a pivotal role for cross-border payments. The statistics cover monthly payment message data for more than 200 countries and jurisdictions from 2011 to 2019. The data set lays out a network of bilateral relationships (either bank-to-bank or country-to-country). From these payment messages, the following measures can be calculated: (i) a cross-border payment message from one country to another identifies a corridor; (ii) a cross-border payment message from one bank to another identifies a correspondent banking relationship; and (iii) the count of active correspondents measures, corridor by corridor, the number of banks abroad that have received messages sent by banks in a given country.

Continue to the full article --> here

 


NCFA Jan 2018 resize - New correspondent banking data - the decline continues at a slower pace* The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

Latest news - New correspondent banking data - the decline continues at a slower pace*FF Logo 400 v3 - New correspondent banking data - the decline continues at a slower pace*community social impact - New correspondent banking data - the decline continues at a slower pace*

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2020 FINTECH DRAFT PITCHING AND DEMO COMPANY WINNERS!



FFCON20 Pitching and Demo Winners - New correspondent banking data - the decline continues at a slower pace*



NCFA COVID 19 letter to government to support Fintechs and SMEs - New correspondent banking data - the decline continues at a slower pace*

NCFA Newsletter subscribe600 - New correspondent banking data - the decline continues at a slower pace*

 

share save 171 16 - New correspondent banking data - the decline continues at a slower pace*

Delighting in the possible

share save 171 16 - Delighting in the possible

McKinsey & Company | By Zafer Achi and Jennifer Garvey Berger  | March 1, 2015

Different perspectives - Delighting in the possibleIn an unpredictable world, executives should stretch beyond managing the probable.

Moving from “managing the probable” to “leading the possible” requires us to address challenges in a fundamentally different way. Rather than simply disaggregating complexities into pieces we find more tractable, we should also broaden our range of interventions by breaking out of familiar patterns and using a whole new approach that allows us to expand our options, experiment in low-risk ways, and realize potentially outsized payoffs. But be warned: leading the possible involves coping with our own anxieties about an unknowable and uncontrollable world. A few simple habits of mind presented here can prod us toward thinking and acting differently. These should not be considered a checklist of to-dos; indeed, the very point is to move beyond a check-the-box mentality.

Unexpected possibilities

We relish stories of unexpected possibilities—little bets that created huge and unforeseen benefits. Twitter, for instance, was born when its creators noticed how alive and engaged they felt when communicating with each other in real time over SMS. The concept was brilliant, and the platform has reshaped the way the world communicates. But the initiative arose from brainstorming rather than an elaborate business plan.

See:  From Innovation Hub to Innovation Culture

Tweeting caught on, in large part, because it grants its users freedom. In fact, Twitter cofounder Evan Williams has explained that, in general, his rule is to do less. We can’t foresee how uncertain conditions will unfold or how complex systems will evolve, but we can conduct thoughtful experiments to explore the possibilities.

Ask different questions

The questions we ask emerge from our typical patterns of thought. We focus on narrowing down a problem so that we can find a solution. But we often fail to notice that in doing so we constrain the solution and make it ordinary. Asking different questions helps slow down the process. We begin to take in the full range of data available to us and in consequence have a significantly wider set of possible options. Examples of such questions include the following:

  • What do I expect not to find? How could I attune to the unexpected?
  • What might I be discounting or explaining away a little too quickly?
  • What would happen if I shifted one of my core assumptions on an issue, just as an experiment?

Take multiple perspectives

No one can predict when or where the next vital idea will emerge, but we can support an expansive view of our present conditions. We can start by pushing back on our natural inclination to believe that the data we see are all the data we need and by distrusting our natural craving for alignment. Considering multiple perspectives opens up our field of vision. Diversity might create more disagreement and short-term conflict, but in an uncertain environment, a more expansive set of solutions is desirable.

See:  More Businesses Should Follow the Jeff Bezos ‘Country Club’ Rule

We can try these approaches:

  • Take the perspective of someone who frustrates or irritates us. What might that person have to teach us?
  • Seek out the opinions of people beyond our comfort zone. The perspectives of, among others, younger people, more junior staff, and dissatisfied customers can be insightful and surprising.
  • Listen to what other people have to say. We should not try to convince them to change their conclusions; we should listen to learn. If we can understand their perspectives well enough, we might even find that our own conclusions change.

Continue to the full article --> here

 


NCFA Jan 2018 resize - Delighting in the possible The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

Latest news - Delighting in the possibleFF Logo 400 v3 - Delighting in the possiblecommunity social impact - Delighting in the possible

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2020 FINTECH DRAFT PITCHING AND DEMO COMPANY WINNERS!



FFCON20 Pitching and Demo Winners - Delighting in the possible



NCFA COVID 19 letter to government to support Fintechs and SMEs - Delighting in the possible

NCFA Newsletter subscribe600 - Delighting in the possible

 

share save 171 16 - Delighting in the possible