FFCON21 Breaking Barriers May 11-13, 2021

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ETF investors say Coinbase listing will cause explosion in crypto investing

ComplianceX | Jack J. Kelly | Apr 12, 2021

Cryptocurrencies - ETF investors say Coinbase listing will cause explosion in crypto investingThe pending Coinbase direct listing, scheduled for Wednesday on the Nasdaq under the symbol COIN, is exciting a broad base of the investment community outside the usual cryptocurrency crowd.

“Coinbase is going to blow people’s minds,” said Matt Hougan, chief investment officer at Bitwise Asset Management, which pioneered the first cryptocurrency index fund. “I think it’s going to force traditional finance to wrestle with the phenomenal growth that is taking place in crypto.”

It’s not hard to understand why. Coinbase is likely the biggest beneficiary of the cryptocurrency revival. It had 56 million verified users, with $1.8 billion in revenues in the first quarter alone, and a value that could be anywhere from $50 billion to $100 billion.

That is an extraordinary valuation for an exchange of any type. By contrast, Intercontinental Exchange, which runs the New York Stock Exchange, has a market cap of $65 billion, while Nasdaq has a market cap of $25 billion.

See:  The Under-Appreciated Significance of Coinbase Going Public

That kind of valuation is getting the investment community — and particularly exchange-traded fund investors — very excited.

Biggest crypto pure play

Crypto assets have had the same problem that other hot commodities (like pot or space) have had in the past: a high degree of interest with a notable lack of investible assets. Coinbase, however, will go a long way toward solving that problem.  Because ownership of crypto by individuals and institutions is still fairly low, many believe the valuation of Coinbase will encourage more private entities to go public.

“I think we’re going to see a gold rush for crypto equities as investors realize just how fast the ‘picks and shovels’ companies of the crypto ecosystem are growing,” Hougan said.

Michelle Bond, a former senior counsel at the SEC who is now CEO of the Association for Digital Asset Markets, an association of firms in the digital marketplace, said "the Coinbase listing will break down headline barriers because this will have to be approved by a traditional financial regulator, ensuring transparency, integrity and disclosure.”

Will the SEC finally approve a bitcoin ETF?

While bitcoin ETFs exist in the U.S., they do not directly own bitcoin. They own portfolios of stocks deemed to have exposure to blockchain technology.  A bitcoin ETF that owns bitcoin is a long-awaited dream of crypto investors because it will greatly expand the class of potential owners.

“A bitcoin ETF will provide an easy, simple and efficient way to own bitcoin,” said Som Seif, who runs the Purpose Bitcoin ETF, which trades in Canada. “Just like gold, the storage and custody of bitcoin is unique. An ETF solves that problem. Also it’s like a stamp of approval: There’s institutional backing. The GLD [Gold ETF] changed the world when it came out in 2004. It made it easy to own gold as an asset class.”

See:  Canadian Regulators Green Light World’s First Bitcoin ETF for Retail Investors

Several weeks ago, the SEC acknowledged the receipt of Van Eck’s bitcoin ETF application, which set in motion a 45-day regulatory review period. At the end of that period, the SEC must either approve, deny or extend the review period. Several other firms, including Fidelity, have also applied for a bitcoin ETF.  Most observers believe the SEC will punt and seek to extend the review period. The maximum period is 240 days.  However, most bitcoin watchers believe late 2021 could finally be the year a bitcoin ETF is approved.

“The biggest potential change is [SEC Chair nominee] Gary Gensler,” Magoon said, noting that Gensler has taught cryptocurrencies and appears more receptive to a bitcoin filing. He also noted that SEC Commissioner Hester Peirce, a Republican, has also been a supporter of a bitcoin ETF.

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NCFA Jan 2018 resize - ETF investors say Coinbase listing will cause explosion in crypto investing The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

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How the no code movement is changing companies and empowering problem solvers

Sifted | Freya Pratty | Apr 8, 2021

tines - How the no code movement is changing companies and empowering problem solversNo code means the people who understand a problem the most are the ones devising its solution, says no code startup Tines.

No code — tech that helps people develop software without the need for code — is having a moment.

It’s projected that no code companies will be worth a collective $21bn by 2022; compared to the $3.5bn they were worth in 2017.

Emblematic of the trend is Tines, a startup based in Dublin that runs a no code platform helping to automate security work. Tines has just raised a $26m Series B round, led by Addition and including participation from Accel and Blossom Capital.

See:  How to Think About Your Business Model and Pitch It to Investors

Tines cofounder Eoin Hinchy says no code has the potential to make significant changes to the way we work: from giving a more diverse range of key skillsets, to freeing up staff time and ensuring the people who know most about a problem are the ones devising its solution.

Excel is the original no code platform, he says. It’s a platform that enables anyone to create a spreadsheet, with no coding or software development knowledge required.

No code is about developing similar platforms for other functions, so more people can build things without having to learn to code.

Tines

Tines is a no code platform for security analysts. Hinchy used to work in tech security himself — for companies like eBay, Docusign and PayPal —  where he says he realised that 80% of his team’s time was spent on repetitive tasks.

“It takes six months to hire a security analyst, then you’ve got them doing the same menial tasks over and over again,” he says. “And because they’re security experts not software engineers, they can’t write the code to get themselves off the treadmill.”

Tines aims to help those security experts to create their own automated solutions. The platform has broken down automation into seven actions which it says take three hours to learn how to use and, from there, people can automate any process themselves.

“Anyone, no matter what their technology background, will be as effective as a senior software engineer after three hours,” Hinchy says.

See:  Techlash continues to batter technology sector

The platform aims to automate 99% of menial tasks, be it things like sending responses to phishing emails, onboarding new employees, sending emails, updating systems or modifying incoming events.

What will no code change?

The central idea behind no code, and one of the main reasons people find it so exciting, is that it puts the people who understand a problem the most in the position to devise its solution. In the case of Tines, that’s the security experts.

“That’s when automation is successful, when it’s automated by the people who know the problem best,” says Hinchy.

This automation frees up staff to work on other tasks — in security, that means longer term risk reduction work. No code also, Hinchy, says, means that a more diverse array of staff have the skills to work on the solution to a problem.

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NCFA Jan 2018 resize - How the no code movement is changing companies and empowering problem solvers The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

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Techlash continues to batter technology sector

Brookings | Darrell West | Apr 2, 2021

Tech Backlash - Techlash continues to batter technology sector

Source: Felix Decombat

In our Brookings Press book, Turning Point: Policymaking in the Era of Artificial Intelligence published last year, John Allen and I note the backlash against technology that has reduced public support for many things digital. As an illustration, Pew Research Center surveys show people are worried about privacy intrusions, cybersecurity risks, and misinformation campaigns. Many individuals think the pace of technological change is advancing too rapidly and it is hard to distinguish fake from actual phenomena.

Now a new Edelman Trust Barometer poll shows how much more widely this “techlash” has spread. In the United States, trust in the technology sector has fallen from 78% in 2012 to 57% in 2021. Globally, tech sector trust has dropped from 77% to 68% during that time.

In less than a decade, according to that firm, the public has grown far more suspicious about misinformation, personal privacy, 5G networks, and AI bias, among other things.

The decline of public trust in the technology sector has profound consequences for how people view digitization and options for government oversight and regulation. The precipitous drop over the past year is noteworthy because of the crucial role technology has played in the pandemic response. Due to COVID-19, people have shifted to online learning, telemedicine, remote work, and e-commerce.

See:  Edelman Canadian Trust Report: Trust declines in all sectors including 8% in technology

In this situation of widespread technology utilization to cope with the social distancing requirements of the pandemic, one might imagine the public would see the benefits produced in at least some of these areas would outweigh the costs and the risks. COVID-19 forced what otherwise might have been five years of digital change into five weeks. Nearly everyone has grown quite dependent on technology to work, learn, and communicate. That should have boosted public confidence in technology.

In the United States, trust in the technology sector has fallen from 78% in 2012 to 57% in 2021. Globally, tech sector trust has dropped from 77% to 68% during that time.

Yet the loss of trust suggests many are not happy with the role technology plays in their pandemic lives and feel there are many problems that need to be addressed. Although digital connections helped them work remotely, a number are suffering from Zoom fatigue, misinformation, privacy loss, and social isolation. A significant percentage seems to feel that tech risks outweigh benefits.

In addition, widely reported problems with online learning platforms have frustrated students, parents, teachers, and administrators. Rather than boosting confidence, these issues have eroded public trust. Although technology enables some types of learning, some experts have concluded students learned far less from online platforms than what would have been the case with in-person classrooms.

See:  PwC Report: Canadian Digital Trust Insights 2021: Cybersecurity comes of age

If public opinion continues to trend in negative directions for the technology sector, both in the United States and around the world, it likely will broaden support for government actions that regulate technology, raise taxes, ban certain applications, and limit product rollouts seen as detrimental to humanity.

A lack of public confidence will encourage political leaders to take tough regulatory actions and limit the freedom private companies have had for decades to develop new products, bring them to the marketplace, and engage in international commerce.

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NCFA Jan 2018 resize - Techlash continues to batter technology sector The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

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Crypto whale ‘Metakovan’ sees NFTs as ‘huge risk’ for traders

BNN Bloomberg | Joanna Ossinger | Apr 6, 2021

Vignesh Sundaresan - Crypto whale 'Metakovan' sees NFTs as ‘huge risk’ for tradersThe cryptocurrency entrepreneur who spent more than US$69 million for a piece of digital art has a message for speculative buyers of non-fungible tokens: be prepared to lose your money.

Vignesh Sundaresan, also known by the online moniker MetaKovan, vaulted into the spotlight last month after paying a record-breaking sum for the NFT of Beeple’s “Everydays: The First 5,000 Days.” As Sundaresan tells it, his motivation wasn’t to make money but to support the artist and showcase the technology.

Anyone trying to profit from NFTs is “taking a huge risk,” he said in a video interview. “It’s even crazier than investing in crypto.”

The comments may raise eyebrows coming from someone who made his fortune in cryptocurrencies and has done more than perhaps anyone else to fuel the mania surrounding NFTs with big-ticket purchases of digital art. But it’s also hard to argue with Sundaresan’s warning: Average prices for NFTs tracked by Nonfungible.com tumbled almost 70 per cent from a peak in February through early April.

See:  After you die what happens to your digital assets and NFTs?

B.20, a token created by Sundaresan to enable “shared ownership of an open art project” that includes some of Beeple’s works, has dropped to about US$7 from US$23 since he won the Christie’s auction for Everydays on March 11. It was trading below 50 cents in January, according to CoinGecko.com.

The extraordinary boom and bust has fueled a debate over whether NFTs -- essentially digital certificates of authenticity -- will have a lasting impact on markets for art, collectibles and beyond, or turn into the latest example of an investment bubble that enriches a select few while saddling latecomers with losses.

Some skeptics have questioned whether Sundaresan’s Everydays purchase was partly an attempt to drive up the value of his existing NFT positions. He denies having profited from the transaction and said he hasn’t sold his personal holdings of B.20 tokens.

On the long-term outlook for NFTs, Sundaresan agrees with aspects of both the bull and the bear case. He describes the technology as an enduring innovation that will enable a “new patronage movement” for artists and other content creators, many of whom now rely on ad-supported revenue models via internet platforms like Instagram. But Sundaresan also said the fervor around many of the highest-priced NFTs will likely fade.

See:  What’s possible with Non Fungible Tokens (NFTs)

“I don’t think NFTs will hold the same kind of hype forever around high-value items,” he said. “The market will get divided. There will be very few high-value items and an infinite number of very low-valued items.”  He said the best way to participate is by purchasing NFTs from artists you want to support. “It’s not primarily an investment,” said Sundaresan, who grew up collecting stamps and WWE playing cards.

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NCFA Jan 2018 resize - Crypto whale 'Metakovan' sees NFTs as ‘huge risk’ for traders The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

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Supreme Court handed Google a win in a decade-long court battle with Oracle

The New York Times | | Apr 5, 2021

Google vs oracle supreme court - Supreme Court handed Google a win in a decade-long court battle with Oracle

The 6-2 ruling, which overturns a victory for Oracle, marks a climax to a decade-old case that divided Silicon Valley and promised to reshape the rules for the software industry. Oracle was seeking as much as $9 billion.

On Monday, the Supreme Court said it was kosher to copy someone else’s computer code in some cases. That handed Google a win in a decade-long court battle with Oracle over the guts of the Android smartphone system.

See:  Our patent and copyright system isn’t prepared for inventions or designs by AI

I’ll explain why the technology industry was relieved by the decision, and the ways it might be relevant for artists, writers and archivists. I also want us to ponder this: Why are thorny legal questions seemingly inescapable in technology right now?

What was the legal case?

Oracle controls software programming technologies called Java that are a building block for many apps and digital services. Google used a relatively small chunk of Java computer code in its Android operating system, and that made it easier for software experts to make smartphone apps.

In the Google v. Oracle America case, Google said it was standard practice to copy what are called application programming interfaces, or APIs, a set of instructions to make sure that technologies from different companies can work together. Oracle said that Google stole its software and demanded billions of dollars. Each company said it was trying to save the tech industry from ruin.

This is complicated stuff that made lawyers on both sides and the justices grasping for analogies — safecracking, football playbooks and restaurant menus — to explain APIs. In his majority opinion on behalf of six justices, Justice Stephen G. Breyer compared APIs to the gas pedal, which tells a car to move faster, and a keyboard that types a letter when you press a specific key.

A big question went unanswered, but it might not matter.

Google won. Although as my colleague Adam Liptak wrote, the Supreme Court had previously said it would answer two questions: Whether companies like Oracle could copyright APIs, and if so, whether Google’s use of them fit an exception to the copyright law known as fair use. A majority of the justices answered only the second question, with a yes.

See:  The future relationship between AI and IP

Two justices, Clarence Thomas and Samuel A. Alito Jr., said it was a mistake to sidestep the question of whether APIs are protected by copyright laws. Justice Thomas wrote that he would have said yes.

Even though the justices left an open question, intellectual property lawyers told me that the decision should give comfort to companies that use APIs. The Supreme Court essentially blessed what Google did because it took APIs and transformed the software into something new that can benefit all of us.

Many technologists had sided with Google — even those who aren’t usually fans of the company. They worried that if companies could prevent rivals from using APIs or charge exorbitant prices to use them, it could discourage companies from inventing new products. For them, the Supreme Court decision brought relief.

The technology industry is racked with legal questions now: How should the First Amendment apply to social media companies? Do antitrust laws need to be rewritten for Big Tech? Does a 25-year-old internet law preserve people’s free expression or crush it? Tech now revolves around laws, not just computer code.

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NCFA Jan 2018 resize - Supreme Court handed Google a win in a decade-long court battle with Oracle The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

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New head of Communitech leading incubator says ‘no reason why Canada couldn’t be the global hub of innovation’

Financial Post| Bianca Bharti | Apr 5, 2021

Chris albinson and Communitech - New head of Communitech leading incubator says 'no reason why Canada couldn't be the global hub of innovation'There is no reason why Canada couldn't be the global hub of innovation'

Canada needs to foster companies that can compete on a global scale if it wants to build a sustainable technology ecosystem, according to the incoming chief executive of one of the country’s top tech incubators.

Chris Albinson, a Canadian venture capitalist who has spent the better part of two decades in California, was on Monday named the next head of Communitech, the Waterloo-based incubator that has more than 1,600 member companies.

A Kingston, Ont.-native, Albinson helped build the C100 network in Silicon Valley, a who’s who of Canadian technology leaders who came together to encourage collaboration and growth.

“To have a healthy ecosystem, you need big trees,” Albinson said in a recent interview with the Financial Post. “We need more big trees, otherwise, when the storms come through, stuff gets wiped out.”

See:  4 Ways the Startup Landscape Will Shift in 2021

In Canada, that means more companies like Shopify.

Albinson says the time is especially ripe for Canada to establish itself as a formidable player, in part due to the pandemic. Remote work has caused some companies to set up offices outside of cities as talent, once concentrated in urban centres, now flee.

“Everyone assumes that the Valley’s sort of a fixed (hub),” Albinson said, before pointing to Boston, which was considered the centre of innovation in the 1990s before the San Francisco Bay area stole the crown.In order to get there, Albinson says we need to aspire to build globally relevant companies that can sustain long-term growth, something that’s already happening.

“When I talked to Canadian entrepreneurs coast to coast … they want to build the next Shopify,” Albinson said.

People also tend to forget, he said, that a University of Waterloo graduate, Apoorva Mehta, started Instacart.

See:  Magnetic North: How Canada Holds its Own in the Global Race for Innovation Talent

He sees businesses such as Clearbanc, a company that helps finance entrepreneurs, and ApplyBoard, a company that helps foreigners apply to Canadian universities, as signs that Canada’s tech space is ready to explode.

It’s doubly helpful that the ecosystem up north is more inviting than stateside because Canada has a better immigration system, there is access to global markets and capital and we’re leading in artificial intelligence, robotics and machine learning, Albinson said.

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NCFA Jan 2018 resize - New head of Communitech leading incubator says 'no reason why Canada couldn't be the global hub of innovation' The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

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Financial advice blows up on TikTok. The narrative has changed.

InvestmentNews | Nicole Casperson | Feb 15, 2021

TikTok financial influencers - Financial advice blows up on TikTok.  The narrative has changed.

In the past, advisers viewed social media as a marketing tool that targeted only millennial and Gen Z clients. That narrative has changed.

Imagine having less than a minute to dispense financial advice while standing in a room of thousands, or even millions, of potential clients. Now imagine doing that alone from the comfort of your home, with a smartphone and mobile app as the only tools needed.

That’s what financial advice is on TikTok, the short-form, video-sharing app. Type the hashtag personal finance — #personalfinance — into the TikTok app’s search bar and thousands of videos pop up that provide viewers with financial advice and explanations of financial terminology in the form of 60-second videos.

See:  Can Reddit Forums Take Down Hedge Funds? Why GameStop Stock Soared

Financial influencers, some certified financial planners and some not, have leveraged society’s social media obsession to answer finance questions online ranging from “What’s a short squeeze?” to “How do I start saving for retirement?” in order to rack up followers and build a business.

These efforts are flourishing: TikTok videos tagged #personalfinance have garnered 3.5 billion views from the more than 1 billion monthly active users on TikTok, according to mobile data and analytics platform App Annie. By comparison, videos found under two other popular hashtags, #cookingtips or #healthtips, have 2.6 billion and 2.1 billion views, respectively.

While expanding financial advice to a wide range of young investors is a good thing, there is potential for bad results when mixing personal financial advice and TikTok, said Ritholtz Wealth Management CEO Josh Brown.

“Users should be aware that if you’re listening to people on social networks and not even bothering to Google them to see whether they have credentials and blindly doing what those people are saying, that responsibility is on the viewer just as much as it’s on the creator,” Brown said.

For example, some TikTok influencers create videos showing users how they invest in certain stocks to make money. One user, who goes by the TikTok username @Biaheza, shared a video with his 64,000 followers illustrating how he used the free trading app Robinhood to invest in “speculative” and “degenerate” trade options to make money, he said in the video. The user claims his strategy pushed his account value to $124,000.

While the financial advice may be risky, social media influencers with large followings can earn money through these platforms because advertisers will pay content creators to tout brand promotions and sponsorships to their thousands, or millions, of followers.

See:  After you die what happens to your digital assets and NFTs?

In July, TikTok introduced a $200 million TikTok Creator Fund after the platform’s popularity “propelled thousands of creators into brand partnerships, sponsorships, and representation deals,” according to TikTok’s announcement.

Through the fund, TikTok users can apply to earn an income based on these criteria: Users must be 18 or older, have at least 10,000 followers, have at least 10,000 video views in 30 days, and consistently post original content in line with TikTok guidelines.

In the past, advisers largely viewed social media as a marketing tool that targeted only millennial and Gen Z clients. Clearly, that narrative has changed as the pandemic-fueled interest in finance has turned social media and financial advice into a full-blown business model.

INFLUENCER IMPACT

The focus on traditional ultra-high-net-worth clients typically steered advisory firms away from social media and younger investors. But millennials and Gen Z are expected to inherit $68 trillion, the greatest generational wealth transfer, over the coming years.

Younger generations are going to keep making decisions based on what they learn about finance from TikTok videos, she said. The way TikTok’s algorithm delivers content makes it easier to find random videos and introduces personal finance to a group of people who might not have been interested before.

One of the most popular providers of personal finance advice videos, with more than 1.5 million followers and 22.2 million likes on TikTok, is a former Merrill Lynch financial adviser turned social media influencer, Humphrey Yang, who’s known as @humphreytalks.

At 33, the San Francisco-based content creator snowballed on TikTok after he posted finance-focused videos on the platform. One video that went viral shows Yang scaling former Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ net worth with rice, with each grain representing $100,000.

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NCFA Jan 2018 resize - Financial advice blows up on TikTok.  The narrative has changed. The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association (NCFA Canada) is a financial innovation ecosystem that provides education, market intelligence, industry stewardship, networking and funding opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and funding industry in Canada. Decentralized and distributed, NCFA is engaged with global stakeholders and helps incubate projects and investment in fintech, alternative finance, crowdfunding, peer-to-peer finance, payments, digital assets and tokens, blockchain, cryptocurrency, regtech, and insurtech sectors. Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE! Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

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