Category Archives: Online Funding Campaigns

MLG Blockchain Pioneers Crypto Fundraiser for Special Olympics Canada Foundation

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MLG Blockchain release | May 14, 2018

TORONTO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--MLG Blockchain, an expert blockchain consultant and development firm, has launched a crypto fundraising initiative to support and raise awareness in support of the Special Olympics Canada Foundation. MLG aims to raise $5000 in cryptocurrency donations or regular Canadian dollar donations for both the 2018 motionball Marathon of Sport Toronto and the #NoGoodWay campaign.

@MLGBlockchain aims to raise $5000 in #crypto donations or regular Canadian $ #donations for both the 2018 @motionball and the #NoGoodWay campaign

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"Toronto motionball Marathon of Sport is proud to have MLG Blockchain Consulting join us for this year's event,” said Braeden Hunt, Co-Event Director Toronto motionball Marathon of Sport. “The opportunity to support donations through cryptocurrency is a new fundraising initiative for motionball and the Special Olympics movement, and we are excited to see the results.”

Donors will be able to support this initiative until May 26th, the date on which the motionball Marathon of Sport (MMS) will take place. The MMS is an all-day sports fundraiser for the Special Olympics Canada Foundation. MLG Blockchain has announced it will send a delegation of 10 members to participate in the event, at the Hangar in Downsview Park, Toronto. On this day, 84 teams of motionball supporters, each raising a minimum of $3,000 in pledges and each joined by a Special Olympics athlete, will take to the field for a day of non-stop sports.

“It is refreshing to see such positive social initiatives taking place in Canada. We are very proud to support Special Olympics athletes with the help of the Blockchain community,” commented Michael Gord, CEO at MLG Blockchain.

In addition to this friendly competition, 1,000 Marathon of Sport participants will take a powerful pledge in support of 120 Special Olympics athletes to end the use of the R-word in everyday conversation and take an inspirational stand against anti bullying.

To contribute to the campaign, click on the links below:

For crypto donations: https://commerce.coinbase.com/checkout/844dfef7-5e33-4820-97b0-226c8fad98af
For Canadian dollar donations:
https://www.marathonofsport.com/sponsor/?t=2558

About motionball:

The non-profit organization motionball is introducing the next generation of volunteers and donors to the Special Olympics movement through integrated social and sporting events. motionball now hosts 32 annual events in 19 cities across Canada and is proud to have donated $9.5M to the Special Olympics Canada Foundation since its inception in 2002.

For more information, please visit motionball.com, or follow @motionball on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

About MLG Blockchain:

MLG Blockchain is a global blockchain development and consulting firm headquartered in Toronto with a distributed team across North America, Europe and Asia that is focused on building next-generation applications using blockchain and smart contract technology. MLG Blockchain speeds up your team's understanding of the blockchain and its potential opportunities for your business.

Source release


The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with cryptocurrency, blockchain, crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders globally. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, services, and networking opportunities to over 7500+ members and subscribers and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry.  Join Canada's Fintech & Funding Community today FREE!  Or become a contributing member and get perks. For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

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Here’s what motivates a crowdfunding investor to back a campaign

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Insider.co.uk | By Philip Gates | Apr 23, 2018

Crowdfunding is a rapidly growing way to raise much-needed capital for businesses. But how can you make one eye-catching enough to attract investors? John Auckland of crowdfunding communications agency TribeFirst outlines the dos and don'ts

Equity crowdfunding campaigns - such as Drink Baotic - are all about attracting and engaging investors. So what exactly are investors looking for? What makes the difference in their decision to invest or not?

Retail investors versus sophisticated investors

You can categorise investors into two types: retail and sophisticated.

Retail investors are investing more emotionally. Sophisticated investors typically invest more than retail investors, but the amount they invest doesn’t necessarily reflect their level of sophistication.

Check out:  How to Think About Your Business Model and Pitch It to Investors

While it’s definitely more a spectrum than two clear camps, there are some common identifying features:

● Retail investor goes with gut decision/Sophisticated investors have an appraisal process.

● Retail investors make their decisions based on emotional attachment/Sophisticated investors made decisions based on rational attachment.

● Retail investors will typically look for pros/Sophisticated investors are looking for cons.

● Retail investors = heart first/Sophisticated investors = head first

● Retail investors are gambling with disposable income/Sophisticated investors view crowdfunding as one of the riskier assets in their portfolio.

● Retail investors want to be part of a journey/Sophisticated investors are investing to make a return.

Some critics of crowdfunding have claimed that retail investors shouldn’t exist at all. I find this view patronising.

Firstly, as long as you are aware of the risks, then it’s your money to do with as you will. Secondly, I have seen many well-managed and institutionally-funded companies still go on to fail.

See:  Fintech lures millennial investors away from asset managers

Risk exists everywhere. But is it any less noble to invest in something because you believe in the idea, rather than investing simply to make a profit?

And the crowd has proven it has greater foresight than you’d think. The data suggests the crowd is often as good at predicting the future success of a company as professional analysts.

It’s not surprising, really. The crowd is representative of the market.

What can you do to stand out to both retail AND sophisticated?

So what can you do to appeal to both kinds of investors.

Assuming your company is in a healthy state, organise a consumer marketing and PR campaign to hit at the same time as your crowdfunding campaign.

You’ll be able to update investors with your progress in real time. Having a buzz about your company during your raise will drive retail investors to your campaign and give sophisticated investors confidence.

Also:  Venture funding best practices

What will turn investors off?

There are some things that you need to avoid entirely, including:

● Not answering questions openly on the public forum.

● Not including a financial model.

● Not making yourself available during the campaign.

● Not doing your homework.

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The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

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Fans donate over $500K to Vancouver’s independent Rio Theatre so it can buy its own space

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The Star Vancouver | By | Apr 17, 2018

Corinne Lea, who owns and operates the movie theatre, is starting a new non-profit to help other arts and culture organizations grapple with the city’s affordability crisis.

VANCOUVER — After raising over half a million dollars, the Rio Theatre’s crowdfunding campaign has come to a close, and business owner Corinne Lea is already working to pay it forward.

The Vancouver Art House Society, a newly formed non-profit will manage the money raised through Lea’s campaign, and attempt to purchase the building so that the movie theatre business can continue to rent it out indefinitely. Following the purchase of the building, the VAHS will be looking to see how it can help other struggling arts groups in the city.

“Just like we did with the Rio, we could do for others,” Lea said, explaining that the organization could help with fundraising campaigns for other arts and culture spaces.

One of four remaining independent movie theatres in Vancouver, the Rio Theatre came under threat this winter when the property owners announced they had put the East Broadway building up for sale.

See:  Etherparty Announces Global Crowdfunding Contest Valued at $300,000

Panicked, Corinne Lea began rallying with community members to raise $3.5 million for a down payment on the building. The crowdfunding campaign drew to a close late Monday night with over $500K, making history as the highest-funded campaign to save a theatre through Indiegogo’s fundraising platform. As for the rest, Lea said she will be turning to private investors.

In the midst of the fundraising chaos, Lea and others launched the VAHS and if all goes according to plan, the new non-profit will become the owner of the building.

David Duprey sits on the VAHS board and has been closely involved with its launch. He is the owner of several Vancouver bars — including The Rumpus Room, The Narrow Lounge, and The Emerald Supper Club — and wants to see creativity thrive in Vancouver.

“There’s a lot of stress out there for a lot of art spaces, I mean Red Gate’s about to have to move and the Beaumont’s got $100,000 in property taxes it has to pay a year,” he said.

The VAHS, Duprey said, will help organizations and businesses find and attract investors and advocate for art spaces at city hall.

Despite Lea and Duprey’s forward-thinking, there’s still a lot to be done to save the Rio Theatre, the VAHS’ first project. Lea said that despite the generous offers from private investors, she still needs to come up with at least $1 million for the down payment before May 7.

Challenges aside, community members remain hopeful.

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The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

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The Wait for Grams: Why Telegram Might Just Cancel Its Public ICO

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Coindesk | Brady Dale | Apr 11, 2018

The average crypto enthusiast isn't likely to get their hands on grams - Telegram's crypto token - anytime soon.

While half of the ambitious $1.2 billion the messaging giant hoped to raise was supposed to come from an ICO open to public investors, recent SEC filings confirm Telegram has already raised $1.7 billion from two private sales. Now, sources with knowledge of the deal believe the company is likely to scrap its public sale altogether.

The reason? Raising money from the public could be way more trouble than it's worth.

For one, Telegram's blockchain, called the Telegram Open Network (TON), hasn't been built yet. (To be clear, no one has received any grams.) As such, Telegram is selling what basically amounts to IOUs for future grams under the Simple Agreement for Future Tokens (SAFT) framework.

That means - as displayed by the company's SEC filings - the company is selling a security, which cannot be sold to non-accredited investors (except under some exemptions).

"The regulatory environment is in a weird place with most teams having more questions than answers," said Anthony Pompliano, a general partner at Morgan Creek Capital Blockchain. "If teams can raise their capital goals in private sales, they'll continue to do so until there is less ambiguity in regulations."

This appears to be what Telegram is doing, although it's been tough to tell exactly what the founders are thinking since they've said nothing about the ICO or TON, both of which the white paper details will help facilitate a network of faster payments, file-sharing, decentralized privacy, domain registration and more.

Telegram did not respond to a request for comment.

Pompliano told CoinDesk:

"The goal of fundraising is to gain access to capital to allow a team to build a product and company. It appears Telegram has already achieved their goal so there would be no reason to conduct a public sale."

Tech first

This is especially cogent as it relates to the amount of work a legal public sale would entail.

For one, Telegram would have to go through a know-your-customer and anti-money laundering verification process to be able to sell to everyday investors.

For private, known investors that have been identified plenty of times for investment purposes, the verification work is less cumbersome, but for a store cashier who is investing for the first time, it's more challenging to prove they are who they say they are. And it just has to do it so many more times. This would be no small lift and may not be attractive to a company that already has plenty of money.

Plus, there's already a secondary market for grams whereby small investors are buying the crypto tokens from whales that got into the private sales, according to Alexander Borodich, an alum of the Mail.ru Group, one of Russia's largest tech companies, and an angel investor passed on the opportunity to invest in Telegram's ICO.

As such, he said it's unclear whether a legit public sale will happen.

The TON technical white paper describes an ongoing token sale that will continue intermittently well into the future. That phase may be a sort of public sale, but one that won't begin until the protocol launches.

See:  George Soros Prepares to Trade Cryptocurrencies

And according to Sid Kalla of the Turing Advisory Group, building the product before selling to the public would be that smart thing for Telegram to do.

He told CoinDesk:

"The private sales were raised at around the top of the market euphoria. For a public valuation to reach back to those levels, the crypto community would need to see something concrete."

Public opinion

Which is another reason Telegram may discard it's public sale for some time - so it doesn't have to deal with thousands of people's unsolicited opinions.

When a company decides to do a public sale, it introduces complexity into its public relations.

That's why large, publicly traded companies devote whole departments to investor relations, said Stephen Palley of the law firm Anderson Kill. And that's something young startups may not have bandwidth to manage, he said.

"In this twilight world of ICO crowdfunding, you have a company that's brand new, it's a startup ... You suddenly have thousands -- tens of thousands -- of people who feel like they are stakeholders," Palley continued, adding:

"Do you really want to manage all those people?"

While Telegram is five years old, it's still a relatively small company that's so far bootstrapped development of its messaging platform from the founders' own pockets, which suggests it doesn't have experience in investor relations.

See:  Introducing the Convergence Ecosystem

Kalla agreed, telling CoinDesk, "Since Telegram is trying to solve several hard technological problems (like sharding, say) there may be inevitable delays and setbacks. The private investors are likely more used to such things than the public at large."

As much as possible

That said, not everyone agrees that Telegram will scrap its public sale so soon.

"I see no motivation for Telegram to call off their public sale," Joe DiPasquale, CEO of the crypto fund-of-funds BitBull Capital, wrote CoinDesk via a spokesperson.

"They seem dead set on raising as much capital as possible ... Considering they're targeting the mass adoption of their user base, I can't imagine them estranging the masses by canceling the public sale."

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The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

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Close to $4.9M raised for Humboldt Broncos after deadly bus crash

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CTV News | Staff | April 7, 2018

 

Support for the Humboldt Broncos and their families is pouring in after a bus carrying the junior hockey team collided with a transport truck on a Saskatchewan highway, leaving 15 people dead and injuring another 14.

The accident occurred about 200 kilometres northeast of Saskatoon, late Friday afternoon. The RCMP confirmed 29 people were on the bus at the time of the accident.

By Saturday afternoon, there was a three-hour wait at a Saskatoon blood clinic with many people eager to donate to the victims. Staff said many of the donors were first-timers eager to help those hurt in the crash.

A GoFundMe crowdfunding campaign, started by a resident of Humboldt, Sask. had raised close to $4.9 million by Monday morning to help players and their families cope with expenses, two days after coming online.

A photo tweeted early on Saturday showed three players holding hands while laying side-by-side in their hospital beds.

The mother of former NHL player Colby Armstrong, who is originally from Saskatchewan, offered a place to stay in Saskatoon to families impacted by the crash.The Canalta Hotels chain is also offering free rooms on Saturday in Melfort, Humboldt and Martensville, so family members can stay near the victims of the accident who are in hospital.

Jordan Gadsby of the Nipawin Apostolic Church said members of his community are coming together to support those in need.

“People just want to do something,” he told CTV News Channel. “We were getting phone calls from the local co-op and No Frills and daycares and our mayor, bringing food and bringing blankets for anybody that might need blankets.”

Gadsby said he has a spare room and guest house available for those impacted by the deadly crash.

On Saturday evening, Air Canada took to Twitter to offer help to those needing to travel to the province.

Continue to the full article --> here

 


The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

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TokenFunder ITO Opportunity until April 30 and Interview with CEO Alan Wunsche – Getting Down to Brass Tacks

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NCFA Canada | April 5, 2017

With NCFA Blockchain Advisor and Founder/CEO of TokenFunder, Alan Wunsche, having an active Initial Token Offering (ITO) in the market until it closes April 30, 2018 (available to all types of investors including retail), we thought it would be a great opportunity to interview Alan to shed some light on the TokenFunder vision, ITO itself, and roadmap ahead.

What drives you forward personally with TokenFunder?

Alan:  What drives me forward are possibilities for economic innovation and a transformation of finance with new technologies. We’re seeing the decentralization and democratization of finance through open source monetary systems on blockchains.  This is real fintech innovation happening right now.  Programmable blockchains combining a smart contract (called a “token”) with multiple features such as the ability to easily send cryptocurrency – that is our future now.  With cryptocurrency, investors around the world can be direct investors in a startup. At TokenFunder, we want to make this funding option possible for all companies.

 

You’re a blockchain expert but also a CPA.  Can you provide a regulatory perspective on the innovation of digital coins and token offerings?

Alan:  As a CPA, I’m a professional who cares about investors and getting transparency and disclosure for investors. Permissionless and direct investing sounds incredible but most investors know that investing in general is a regulated space and investing in public companies differs from investing in private companies, especially with early stage projects.

In 2017, while TokenFunder was working with the Ontario Securities Commission LaunchPad, we experienced an explosion of Initial Coin Offerings (“ICOs”) around the world. Over $6B was raised by ICOs with blockchain tokens and these projects proved the power of the technology to enable permissionless investing.

Many of these ICOs became black holes that offloaded most of the risk onto their investors.  One big problem with many ICOs is that purchasers (contributors) received coins/tokens but no rights in the company. Many ICO projects encourage a pump and dump mentality full of speculation with large pre-ICO discounts and it’s difficult to know who’s involved and the real value of the project.  Ultimately a lot of hype…and in many cases investors aren’t getting a level playing field. You can imagine how that’s a big issue for regulators. We also think investors will demand more.

"TokenFunder foresaw these issues and so we chose to offer regulated security token offering from the start."

 

What is TokenFunder’s vision?

Alan: TokenFunder’s vision is to transform venture financing by empowering investors to invest directly in the most innovative startups through the power of a regulatory-compliant blockchain-powered funding and growth platform.  Thousands of startups are building large networks of financial and advisory supporters quickly, efficiently, and securely through blockchain technology.  Through cryptocurrencies, blockchain technology is unleashing a global and borderless capital network, and TokenFunder will empower businesses to directly leverage a global capital network that can accelerate success.

A core component of TokenFunder’s vision is being a regulatory-compliant leader in the sector. We’ve worked closely with securities regulators and will continue to seek regulatory approvals that supports a healthy innovation investing ecosystem in this new and exciting blockchain-power era of digital finance. Our roadmap, subject to regulatory approvals, includes liquidity on a trading platform of tokens we issue as well as other tokens.

 

What is TokenFunder building?

Alan:  TokenFunder is building a platform that will reinvent venture capital with a trusted, regulated end-to-end blockchain token launch and governance service to help innovators fund and grow their businesses. We call the core platform STAMP - a Smart Token Asset Management Platform.  We’re designing the platform with best practice governance features from traditional venture capital such as milestone-based tranche payments. We’ll also be encouraging advisors to engage with the companies through the platform in an advisory token economic model.

What is TokenFunder doing differently?

Alan:  At TokenFunder we came to the market with a new proposition -- to build a platform that would bring the global cryptocurrency pool to companies in a way that included governance features.

The first step was to have Know Your Customer (“KYC”) verification checks in our processes and also to check for investor suitability.  Think back to all the 2017 ICOs that took in funding anonymously, who didn’t know where the funds came from and whether their project was a suitable investment for the backer. Without this information, they literally can’t care about their investors even if they wanted to.  This is naturally a problem for securities and investment regulators whose mandate is investor protections.

Before you can invest in TokenFunder’s Initial Token Offering, we have KYC verification and suitability checks. We’re building KYC whitelisting into the FNDR token that we’re going to distribute to our token holders so you’re not going to be able to invest anonymously.

 

TokenFunder has an active ITO where any investor can participate in future revenue sharing from TokenFunder profits.  Can you tell us about the opportunity?

Alan:  Important to note that you can invest in TokenFunder’s ITO until the opportunity closes at the end of this month on April 30, 2018.  Our token holders will share in 80% of the future distributions based on the business profits.  Once the ITO closes, all investors that participated in the ITO will receive their FNDR tokens and we’ll be swiftly moving forward with the business roadmap to seek the required regulatory approvals to have the platform registered as a regulatory-compliant token issuance and trading platform.

 

What does it mean to be a token holder?  Do token holders get equity or special participation rights?

Alan:  Token holders are essentially a special class of share with rights to the future distributions made from platform profits. While token holders don’t vote on Board representation, we do in the future plan to give token holders a voting mechanism on the companies that are accepted to the platform.

FNDR token holders will receive a proportionate profit share based on the revenues generated from TokenFunder service fees paid by businesses who use the funding platform and network.  TokenFunder will also receive a portion of the tokens issued by business customers. As this is a security and this is a forward-looking statement, I need to add that the fee model may of course change for competitive and other reasons.

Finally, we expect FNDR tokens to be liquid -- with the appropriate regulatory approvals and restrictions -- and be tradeable on our own exchange or listed on third-party regulated exchanges.

How retail and accredited investors become FNDR token holders:

 

 

FFCON18:  Debate Panel - Is Traditional Venture Capital Dead?


The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

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Crowdfunding campaign to save Toys ‘R’ Us doesn’t include Canadian stores

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Financial Post | Tara Deschamps | March 22, 2018

TORONTO — Toy company executive Isaac Larian is hoping to keep Toys “R” Us’s Canadian operations from going out of business, but a $1 billion crowdfunding campaign he launched to rescue the company doesn’t include the country’s stores.

The executive behind California-based MGA Entertainment Inc., which makes Little Tikes, Bratz and L.O.L. Surprise! toys, announced on Thursday that he and some affiliated investors were seeking $800 million from toy lovers in hopes of acquiring “all or some” of Toy “R” Us’s assets, thus “saving the retail chain and preserving the Toys “R” Us experience for future generations.”

The efforts focus on Toys “R” Us’s U.S. stores and are separate from Larian’s attempts to buy the brand’s 82 Canadian stores, which 20 interested parties are vying for, said Toys “R” Us bankruptcy documents filed in the U.S.

“Toys “R” Us Canada is a good business,” Larian said in a statement previously. “They run it efficiently, and have good leadership. At the right price, it makes economical sense.”

Though the Canadian arm of the company filed for creditor protection in September, it said it has enough financing to stay afloat, even while the company shutters its business in the U.S. and U.K. and is reportedly likely to liquidate its ventures in Australia, France, Poland, Portugal and Spain.

Its Canadian operations are autonomous from its U.S. dealings, but Toys “R” Us CEO David Brandon has said the company will try to bundle its Canadian business with about 200 U.S. stores as it looks to find a buyer.

Larian hasn’t said how much of Toys “R” Us he is seeking.

On Thursday, Larian was drumming up attention for his crowdfunding campaign — which he admitted is for a “staggering” total — but explains that “it would take a very large sum to create a successful bid for the acquisition of such a large entity.”

By 3:30 p.m. ET on Thursday, the campaign had attracted just over $12,000, mostly in denominations of less than $100. Donors were being enticed with promises of #SaveToysRUs bumper stickers, special edition toys, invites to a reopening block party and opportunities to tour the oldest toy factory currently operating in the U.S. depending on the amount they give.

Larian and “various associates” chipped in $200 million for the campaign, leaving the other $800 million to customers. He also vowed to direct 10 per cent of proceeds from all Little Tikes purchases made between Thursday and the campaign’s May 28 end date to the campaign.

The fight to save Toys “R” Us stems in part from the role it played in Larian’s life.

“I sold my first toy to Toys “R” Us. Watching my kids walk through the aisles with smiles on their faces, it was a place for them to truly be free,” said Larian, in an email to the Canadian Press. “There’s a magic many of us experienced walking the aisles of a Toys “R” Us, a magic I want my grandchild to experience. It’s personal for me and I think it feels personal to millions of people across the U.S. and around the world.”

Toys “R” Us didn’t just offer the magic of wandering through aisles of toys. It also brought significant money to toymakers.

 

Continue to the full article --> here

 


The National Crowdfunding & Fintech Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a cross-Canada non-profit actively engaged with both social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, P2P, ICO, and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, and networking opportunities to over 1600+ members and works closely with industry, government, academia, community and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a strong and vibrant crowdfunding and fintech industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit:  www.ncfacanada.org

 

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