Jan 8, 2018: Intro Presentation on Raising Equity and Funding for your Startup

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NCFA Canada | Jan 15, 2018

Slides:  NCFA Canada Founder and CEO, Craig Asano, delivers a presentation on raising equity and funding for the graduating class of Founder Institute companies in Toronto on Jan 8:

  1. Equity & Funding Introduction Date: January 8, 2018 Prepared for: Founders Institute Toronto Prepared by: Craig Asano, NCFA Canada
  2. Fintech & Funding Association Massive Fintech Network Partners Advisors Members 90+ Platforms 20+ Providers 45 Portals 2018 2017 2016 2015 Oct 2012 Programs Services Global Network P1 P2
  3. Are you ready to raise capital?
  4. Are you ready to raise capital? Set your valuation appropriately • Look for comparable businesses • Geographic and investor group dependent • Discounted cash flow. Make your projections realistic. would you be willing to take your compensation as a % of forecast? • Ultimately a negotiation between investors and the business • Expect 10% - 30% dilution per round • Use preferred shares, convertible notes, SAFE / SAFT if uncertain or to avoid significant dilution How much time can you devote to funding? • Do not do this half ass. If after a defined period (ie 1 year) you’ve been unsuccessful then face facts (markets are highly efficient) • Understand potential impact to ego / brand equity and team motivation • Leverage templates. Be resourceful. Seek expertise.
  5. Are you ready to raise capital? How much money should we raise? • Determine key milestones that impact business’ value • IP strategy, Prototype • Sales and Revenue (ie repeat customers/month • Product/market fit or key development milestones • Human resources and team building (growth) • Raise what you need to get you to the next milestone (iterate and prove) Bootstrapping: advance your situation using existing resources Lean start-up: get to market and revenue positive as quickly as possible What non-dilutive sources of capital are available at each step?
  6. Are you ready to raise capital? Understand your initial capital structure (and dilution) • Founders (80-90%), Leadership team (10-15%), Advisors (1-3%) • Skin in the game • Put in writing and use vested agreements • Source cap table excel sheets online
  7. Where can I find Investors? • Identify potential investors and sources of funding (keep doors open): • Government grants / funds • Corporate sponsorships and grant programs • Friends and family, Loans and credit • Crowdfunding (Equity, debt/lending, reward, ICOs/tokens, Royalty) • Angel investors • Venture capital • Dealer-brokers, agents, intermediaries • Private equity interested in side-car investments • Ask for introductions • Global markets Sources of Private Capital
  8. Be strategic with your approach • Make a list of contacts that can realistically help (assign probability and amount you are seeking from them) • Seek to develop long term relationships and understand what you can offer them and vice versa. • Learning loop: Listen – learn – track and improve (alignment, probability) • Start building your funding networks yesterday • Online – personal & company profiles • Offline - Events, conferences, pitch forums, investor networks • Understand the timing of your ask relative to the ‘funding window’ and type of investor • Stay on top of funding research and news to find similar companies to learn from / with. • Ask for introductions • Turn advocates into loyal customers and investors Get in Funding Mode
  9. What are investors looking for? • A product/services that addresses a large market need (not a nice to have) • Team that can execute who has a solid understanding of business and challenges • Validation/proof (de-risk) • Some are seeking social impact or to balance impact with profits The Investment Process • Pitch deck is bare essential • Meet and greet is only the first step • All investment basics must be met • Due diligence review • Terms negotiated • Close (in person) What are investors looking for?
  10. Deal Breakers and Tips • Avoid one man team, no skin in the game, unrealistic valuations, serious character flaws • Raise equity capital with no clear purpose, to replace debt, pay big salaries, to develop an idea and not a business • Face to face meetings (3-5x more capital $ than email or call) • Securing initial key/lead investor will make raising $ significantly easier • Only invest if they know you, know the business and like the investment opportunity What you Need to get Started
  11. Basic Crowdfunding Models < $10K $10 - $250K < $100 - $350K+ < $250K - $3M+ Social Material Investment Benefits
  12. Raising Capital Online in Canada
  13. Wide distribution over the internet • Low cost, efficient, transparent capital • The `great equalizer` • Media/PR, awareness • Increase customer engagement and • Evangelize backers into investors (customer acquisition) • Reduce risk by getting feedback on new launches (product or ventures) • Market research Access to Capital Marketing Platform Validation • Raising funds via crowdfunding markets is a very public and transparent • Protect your IP and speak to a lawyer • Crowdfunding takes a lot of effort and commitment • The majority of Ideas fail to reach their funding goal • How will this affect your companies brand? Expose your Idea Resourcing Failure Crowdfunding Pros/Cons Benefits Risks For Companies
  14. Examples Source: Kickstarter Campaign page Innovation – Social – Incentives – Economic Growth Quidni Estate Winery (NCFA Director) • Just completed $100K equity raise (for 3% equity ownership) • Took over a winery. Went digital (including online wine sales). Converted virtual wine tasters into investors Impak Finance (Equity Offering) • Raised $1.2 million (goal was $500K for 6%) from 1450 shareholders to create first socially responsible Canadian bank • $500,000 in the first 24 hours! • Inclusive & accessible: $100 shares for $100
  15. NCFA Canadian Online Funding Directory Reward/Donation: Equity-based via Dealer: • Steady growth in portals • Equity, Debt & Royalties all emerging • Fintech is all the rage • Real estate and entertainment, film/media crowdfunding emerging Consumer and Small Business Loans:
  16. Crowdfunding Framework Planning & Strategy • The greater your planning efforts, the greater your chance of achieving your funding goal • Do not launch a crowdfunding campaign if you are not ready. (3 months) (40 days – 90 days) (Ongoing) Post-campaign • Your campaign is done but now you have to deliver on your promise • Fulfillment • Ongoing customer engagement Campaign Execution • Daily execution of tasks outlined in the campaign plan • Control, monitor and adapt Feedback Loop
  17. Success Factors SUCCESS 2. Network Strength • Sizeable online network and social media presence? • Will media/PR and influential bloggers cover your story? 1. Quality Idea & Pitch • Unique, enterprising and clear value proposition (conveyed online in a simple manner) • Get others excited about your story? • Clear funding target and specific goals? 4. Key Docs and Content • Compliant and necessary for investor review 3. Strong Committed Team • Is your team credible, committed and willing to deploy the resources and time to execute effectively? • Time management HARD WORK! 5. Marketing Campaign & Incentives • Planning and strategy with ability to execute through launch to post campaign
  18. Common Mistakes • We underestimated the time commitment involved • We didn’t test our campaign sufficiently • We launched before we were ready • We didn’t develop an accurate budget • We didn’t consult legal counsel or professional providers • We didn’t account for taxes • We tried to do everything on a shoestring • We didn’t realize how important the video was • We didn’t understand liability exposure (eg. misrepresentation) and intellectual property • We had little to no traction so we gave up • We blamed it on the portal
  19. Join Us Education & Research Market Access Crowdfunding Infrastructure Capital Raising Prep Services Support and Leadership Advocacy GET IT IN TOUCH Fintech & Funding Association ncfacanada.org crowdfundingsummit.ca

The National Crowdfunding Association of Canada (NCFA Canada) is a national non-profit actively engaged with social and investment crowdfunding, alternative finance, fintech, peer-to-peer (P2P), initial coin offerings (ICO), and online investing stakeholders across the country. NCFA Canada provides education, research, industry stewardship, networking opportunities and services to thousands of community members and works closely with industry, government, academia and eco-system partners and affiliates to create a vibrant and innovative fintech and online financing industry in Canada.  For more information, please visit: www.ncfacanada.org

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